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A peek under the hood of Delphi's Pittsburgh Labs

Aaron Aupperlee
| Friday, Sept. 1, 2017, 3:45 p.m.
A self-driving car under construction at Delphi's facility at the RIDC Industrial Park in O'Hara near Pittsburgh. | Photo from Delphi
A self-driving car under construction at Delphi's facility at the RIDC Industrial Park in O'Hara near Pittsburgh. | Photo from Delphi
A self-driving car under construction at Delphi's facility at the RIDC Industrial Park in O'Hara near Pittsburgh. | Photo from Delphi
A self-driving car under construction at Delphi's facility at the RIDC Industrial Park in O'Hara near Pittsburgh. | Photo from Delphi
A self-driving car under construction at Delphi's facility at the RIDC Industrial Park in O'Hara near Pittsburgh. | Photo from Delphi
A self-driving car under construction at Delphi's facility at the RIDC Industrial Park in O'Hara near Pittsburgh. | Photo from Delphi
A self-driving car under construction at Delphi's facility at the RIDC Industrial Park in O'Hara near Pittsburgh. | Photo from Delphi
A self-driving car under construction at Delphi's facility at the RIDC Industrial Park in O'Hara near Pittsburgh. | Photo from Delphi
A self-driving car under construction at Delphi's facility at the RIDC Industrial Park in O'Hara near Pittsburgh. | Photo from Delphi
A self-driving car under construction at Delphi's facility at the RIDC Industrial Park in O'Hara near Pittsburgh. | Photo from Delphi

Auto-parts supplier Delphi has let few inside its self-driving operations near Pittsburgh.

But on Friday, a day after the company announced it plans to add about 100 jobs to its efforts in Pittsburgh, Delphi tweeted a photo of employees working on a self-driving car inside its Pittsburgh Labs at the RIDC Industrial Park in O'Hara.

The photo is a rare look at the birth of a self-driving car.

The tweeted photo shows engineers around a partially torn apart BMW 5 Series. It contains a link to a Delphi blog post about its work in Pittsburgh , calling the city part of the "heart and soul of automated technology development." The blog post has more photos showing a gutted BMW and engineers adding sensors and cameras.

"Ottomatika is busting at the seams with an influx of interested engineers, jumping at the chance to work on this world-changing technology because they can do just that. Young engineers, right out of school — as well as those with more experience — are thrilled to learn that once they start, they really start. They work on autonomous vehicle technology — right away. From day one, they roll up their sleeves and build self-driving cars," Glen De Vos, the company's CTO, wrote in the blog post.

Delphi bought Ottomatika, a Carnegie Mellon University spinout company, in 2015. You can view open positions at Delphi's Pittsburgh Labs here .

De Vos spoke to the Tribune-Review on Thursday about Delphi's expansion in the region . He said the typically quiet company would no longer be quiet about its autonomous vehicle program.

Aaron Aupperlee is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at aaupperlee@tribweb.com, 412-336-8448 or via Twitter @tinynotebook.

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