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Wolf administration hosts Pennsylvania's first-ever summit on automated vehicles

Aaron Aupperlee
| Monday, Sept. 11, 2017, 2:03 p.m.
Carnegie Mellon University professor Raj Rajkumar holds his hands up to show that his vehicle is driving itself through the parking lot of the Bob O'Connor Golf Course at Schenley Park on Wednesday June 1, 2016. CMU's latest self-driving car is a 2011 Cadillac SRX that takes ramps, merges onto highways and cruises at 70 mph by itself.
James Knox | Tribune-Review
Carnegie Mellon University professor Raj Rajkumar holds his hands up to show that his vehicle is driving itself through the parking lot of the Bob O'Connor Golf Course at Schenley Park on Wednesday June 1, 2016. CMU's latest self-driving car is a 2011 Cadillac SRX that takes ramps, merges onto highways and cruises at 70 mph by itself.
A line of Uber's self-driving Ford Fusions are parked outside the company's Advanced Technology Center in the Strip District.
Tribune-Review
A line of Uber's self-driving Ford Fusions are parked outside the company's Advanced Technology Center in the Strip District.

A Carnegie Mellon University expert on self-driving cars is one of the featured speakers at an automated vehicle summit convened by Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf.

The summit, happening Monday and Tuesday in State College, is the first of its kind in the state.

State officials and experts in the field will talk about how connected and automated vehicle technology will shape the future of travel.

“Automated vehicle technologies will bring significant safety and economic advances, and we need to remain at the forefront of developing them safely,” PennDOT Secretary Leslie S. Richards said in a statement. “This summit is a chance for our partners to understand the changes and opportunities that are coming to Pennsylvania, and how they can best leverage them.”

Officials from PennDOT, state police, the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission and the state departments of Community & Economic Development and Labor & Industry are participating in the summit.

Raj Rajkumar, director of Carnegie Mellon's Technologies for Safe and Efficient Transportation center, spoke on Monday morning. Other key speakers include Richards and Ken Leonard, the director of the U.S. Department of Transportation's Intelligent Transportation Systems Joint Program Office.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is expected to unveil updated guidelines for self-driving cars at an event Tuesday in Michigan.

Aaron Aupperlee is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at aaupperlee@tribweb.com, 412-336-8448 or via Twitter @tinynotebook.

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