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Trib to moderate discussion on 3D printing with PwC, CMU

Aaron Aupperlee
| Wednesday, Oct. 4, 2017, 10:12 a.m.
Professor Jack Beuth, 53 of Ingomar hows off some of the equipment at Carnegie Mellon created by 3-D metal printing using beds of powdered metal melted in layers by either an electron or laser beam, Thursday, Jan. 22, 2015. General Electric is planning to use such machines in its advanced manufacturing facility planned for Findlay, so it can research manufacturing applications for 3-D printing across its various divisions.
Andrew Russell | Trib Total Media
Professor Jack Beuth, 53 of Ingomar hows off some of the equipment at Carnegie Mellon created by 3-D metal printing using beds of powdered metal melted in layers by either an electron or laser beam, Thursday, Jan. 22, 2015. General Electric is planning to use such machines in its advanced manufacturing facility planned for Findlay, so it can research manufacturing applications for 3-D printing across its various divisions.

National Manufacturing Day is Friday and, to celebrate, Carnegie Mellon University, PwC and the Tribune-Review are teaming up to discuss 3D printing and other technologies changing the face of manufacturing.

Trib technology reporter Aaron Aupperlee moderated a discussion between Jack Beuth, a CMU professor of mechanical engineering and co-director of the university's NextManufacturing Center, and Bobby Bono, the industrial manufacturing leader at PwC.

The pair talked about the advancements in 3D printing, how companies are using the technology and what's next for manufacturing.

The discussion took place in CMU's NextManufacturing Center, a world-leading research center for 3D printing. It was broadcast live on the Facebook accounts of both PwC and the Tribune-Review.

National Manufacturing Day was started in 2012 as a way to recognize advancements in manufacturing. It is celebrated on the first Friday in October.

PwC is an international consulting firm formerly known as PricewaterhouseCoopers. The firm announced in January it is investing $11 million this year and potentially $31 million over the next five years in CMU to establish a Risk and Regulatory Services Innovation Center at the university's H. John Heinz III College. The center will use data science and social science to better understand how people react to emerging technologies and new services and focus on topics ranging from public safety and safe cities to information privacy and cyber security. It will also look at how technologies like artificial intelligence and automation could improve auditing.

Aaron Aupperlee is a Tribun-Review staff writer.

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