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Jobs like teachers, social workers, nurses, police could flourish in AI future, CMU dean tells Forbes

Aaron Aupperlee
| Tuesday, Oct. 31, 2017, 4:12 p.m.
Andrew Moore, Dean of the School of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University applauds speakers at Amazon’s South Side Works office Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2016, when the tech giant officially opened its first corporate office in Pittsburgh.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Andrew Moore, Dean of the School of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University applauds speakers at Amazon’s South Side Works office Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2016, when the tech giant officially opened its first corporate office in Pittsburgh.

The coming age of automation and artificial intelligence won't mean the end for jobs like kindergarten teachers, social workers, nurses and police officers.

In fact, automation and AI could usher in an era in which society is able to spend more on the services those jobs provide, Andrew Moore, dean of Carnegie Mellon University's School of Computer Science, said in an interview published on Forbes.com on Tuesday .

Moore said advances in technology could lead to a boost in economic productivity.

“Then, if we choose to, our societies can afford to aggressively fund things like elder care, social work and education. Depending on how the economics and politics go, we could use the savings from the productivity increase to train more people for human-to-human interaction types of roles,” Moore told Peter High, president of Metis Strategy, a business and IT advisory firm. “We might be able to afford to have classrooms with one teacher for every five kids, instead of one teacher for every 40 kids.”

Moore was a professor at CMU before he went to Google to start its Pittsburgh office in 2006. In 2014, he returned to CMU to head the School of Computer Science. He tells High his role at the university is “… helping to clear the way for these geniuses to get to do what they want to do,” he said.

Aaron Aupperlee is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at aaupperlee@tribweb.com, 412-336-8448 or via Twitter @tinynotebook.

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