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Twitter pauses future account verification to fix 'busted' system

Aaron Aupperlee
| Thursday, Nov. 9, 2017, 1:12 p.m.
This file photograph taken on December 28, 2016, shows logos of US online news and social networking service Twitter in Vertou, western France.
Internet giants were expected to tell Congress this week that Russian-backed content aimed at manipulating US politics during last year's election was more extensive than first thought. Facebook, Google and Twitter were slated to share what they have learned so far from digging into possible connections between Russian entities and posts, ads, and even videos shared on YouTube.
AFP/Getty Images
This file photograph taken on December 28, 2016, shows logos of US online news and social networking service Twitter in Vertou, western France. Internet giants were expected to tell Congress this week that Russian-backed content aimed at manipulating US politics during last year's election was more extensive than first thought. Facebook, Google and Twitter were slated to share what they have learned so far from digging into possible connections between Russian entities and posts, ads, and even videos shared on YouTube.

Looking to get that little blue check mark next to your Twitter handle?

Be prepared to wait a little longer.

Twitter announced Thursday that it hit the pause button on future verifications as the status has created confusion.

Twitter and its verified account policy came under scrutiny this week when it was revealed that Jason Kessler, the organizer of the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Va., where a protester was killed, had a verified account, according to reporting by The Daily Beast .

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey tweeted that the company is working on a fast fix.

Ed Ho, general manager of Twitter's consumer product, tweeted that the company has known for a while there are problems with its verification program.

Twitter's support website says that the coveted blue verified badge "lets people know that an account of public interest is authentic."

The page said accounts of public interest may be verified, such as accounts by users in music, acting, fashion, government, politics, religion, journalism, media, sports, business and other areas.

"A verified badge does not imply an endorsement by Twitter," the page states.

Twitter has verified 287,241 accounts, according to its @verified account, which automatically follows all verified accounts.

Aaron Aupperlee is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at aaupperlee@tribweb.com, 412-336-8448 or via Twitter @tinynotebook.

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