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2 charged in shooting, 2-hour standoff

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Tuesday, March 13, 2012
 

Pittsburgh police charged two people, one a juvenile, in connection with a shooting in East Liberty that led to a two-hour standoff with SWAT officers.

Police charged Jamal Knox, 18, address unknown, with attempted homicide, firing a gun into an occupied structure, burglary and other crimes. They charged a 14-year-old boy who accompanied Knox with burglary, according to a criminal complaint.

Deshawn Pryor, 18, address unknown, was walking from the Penn Circle McDonald's with a cousin around 5 p.m. Sunday when someone began shooting at them near the intersection of Rippey and North St. Clair streets, police said.

Pryor and his cousin fled toward East Liberty Boulevard, where police found Pryor lying on the ground. Doctors at UPMC Presbyterian in Oakland treated him for gunshot wounds to his back and arm and listed him in stable condition on Monday.

Police said the suspects took cover in a house on Rippey Street and surrendered by 7:55 p.m.

Knox was jailed under a $50,000 bond. Police took the juvenile to the Shuman Juvenile Detention Center.

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