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PSU finance man Gary Schultz praised for 40 'distinguished' years

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Sunday, Nov. 6, 2011
 

Gary Schultz spent more than 40 years at Penn State University, so the school honored him by putting his name on a child care center that opened in September.

Schultz, 62, earned bachelor's and master's degrees from Penn State and went to work for the school in 1971, working his way up to senior vice president for finance and business when he retired in 2009. He managed a staff of 2,500 and oversaw human resources and the university police department.

When his successor left Penn State in July, Schultz returned to the position on an interim basis.

"Gary's contributions have been among the most significant in the history of Penn State," university President Graham B. Spanier said in 2008 when Schultz announced his retirement. "We will forever be grateful for the leadership, wisdom and hard work he provided to his alma mater during the course of a most distinguished career."

Schultz was charged on Saturday -- along with Tim Curley, Penn State's athletic director -- with a felony count of perjury and a summary charge of failing to report child abuse. Charges against the administrators are linked to the state's case against former Penn State defensive coordinator Jerry Sandusky, who was charged with 40 counts related to the sexual abuse of children. Schultz and Curley are expected to surrender to police on Monday.

Schultz has chaired the Penn State Investment Council, which oversees more than $1.6 billion in endowments, and served on the boards of the Milton S. Hershey Medical Center and the Pennsylvania Chamber of Business and Industry, among others.

Dr. Bob Capretto, an Oakmont orthodontist and Penn State alumnus who played football with Sandusky in the late 1960s, praised Schultz as "very smart" and "very unassuming." As someone in charge of spending the university's money, Schultz is one of the most important administrators at the school, he said.

"He basically built that university," Capretto said yesterday.

Curley and Schultz are not the type of administrators who would look the other way if presented with evidence of even a minor violation, Capretto said.

"They don't tolerate much," Capretto said. "They never intentionally broke the rules and worked very hard to know the rules. If it was done, I don't think it was intentional."

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