TribLIVE

| Home

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Greene County family's lawsuit aims to quiet energy company

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

Saturday, Oct. 29, 2011
 

A Greene County couple and their daughter claim in a lawsuit moved to federal court on Friday that Energy Corp. of America has ignored the terms of a contract allowing the company to build a compressor station on their Greene Township property.

Louis and Bessie Vecchio of Dunkard Township and Lisa Vecchio of Greene Township say the 2009 contract allows the Denver-based company to install only one compressor inside a soundproof building, but the company has installed five compressors, and only two of them are inside the structure.

The company also used more land than agreed to in the contract, under which it leases the property for $4,500 per year for 50 years, the lawsuit states.

"The installation and continuous operation of the four additional compressors on the Vecchio Tract has created constant extremely loud noise, 24 hours a day, seven days a week," according to the lawsuit.

David McGowan, one of the Vecchios' attorneys, said the company has a pending application with the Environmental Protection Agency to put up to eight compressors at the site.

The contract with the Vecchios states that the company "shall" enclose the compressor station inside a building with soundproofing, so that's not an optional requirement, McGowan said.

" 'Shall' is a mandatory word," he said.

The Vecchios' lawsuit seeks a court order requiring the company to remove all but one of the compressors and to maintain it in a soundproof structure, he said.

Nicolle Bagnell, one of the lawyers representing the company, referred all questions to a company representative, who could not be reached for comment. The company asked the federal court to take the case because the defendant and plaintiffs live in different states.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Stories

  1. McCutchen, Pirates cruise past Twins
  2. Gibsonia’s Saad shows off Stanley Cup at 911th Airlift Wing
  3. Beaver County widow won’t lose home over $6.30 late fee
  4. Steelers’ Wheaton adjusting his game moving to slot receiver
  5. Steelers unfazed by Brady suspension saga
  6. Pirates notebook: Prospect Tucker unaware of ‘trade’ frenzy
  7. Police: Scottdale man had child porn on computer
  8. Judge adds 2 years to sentence of Baldwin Borough man acquitted of murder
  9. Rossi: ‘Hockey guy’ Sutter will be missed
  10. Plum High School teacher held for court on charges of intimidation
  11. Housing Authority to treat Brookline senior complex for bedbugs