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Faberge: Hodges Family Collection exhibit at Frick Art Museum

It goes without saying that the vast majority of the ladies in attendance during the preview party for "Faberge: The Hodges Family Collection " at the Frick Art Museum on Friday left with some pretty good birthday, anniversary, and Christmas present ideas for the plus-one in their lives.

"Sure, why not• She gets everything she wants," laughed Vince Delie, who co-chaired the soiree with his wife, Donna.

The traveling exhibit was "all about turn-of-the-20th-century luxury" according to the Frick's Greg Langel, who welcomed more than 350, including board chair David Brownlee and Susan, director Bill Bodine, Jane Treherne-Thomas, David and Anne Genter, Chris and Brian Ciaverella, and Susie Durocher (the great-great-granddaughter of Henry Clay Frick).

Following a wine and dine of sumptuous bites including chicken Kiev, poached salmon, mustard dilled shrimp canapes and farshirovannye yaytsa (stuffed eggs garnished with salmon caviar, for those rusty with their Russian), it was on to the exhibit, where accolades could be heard in unison -- "It's gorgeous!" being the most common phrase heard throughout the evening. Interestingly enough, it was the extensive collection of exquisite cigarette cases that seemed to capture most of the attention, including a few smokers in attendance who lamented their current state of affairs.

This is one abfab collection you don't want to miss; a captivating trip back in time to when opulence and jaw-dropping artistry reigned supreme.

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Faberge at the Frick

Faberge at the Frick

Faberge at the Frick on Friday, October 21, 2011

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