Share This Page

Braddock man gets life sentence for killing daughter

A Braddock man on Tuesday called a judge an "idiot" and mocked the system for failing to give him the death penalty for the sexual assault and murder of his toddler daughter.

William Page, 26, erupted after Common Pleas Judge David Cashman told him he deserved to die for assaulting 23-month-old Nyia Page and leaving her to freeze to death Feb. 3, 2007, in an abandoned Rankin playground.

"You should have gotten the death penalty. You not only killed your own daughter ... ," Cashman was saying.

"Listen, idiot, I didn't kill anyone," Page interrupted.

Cashman told Page that he was a "despicable human being" and deserved every day in prison he gets. He sentenced Page to the mandatory life term in prison with no chance of parole plus 21 to 42 years.

Page's courtroom rant sent Nyia's mother, Darlene Scott, into tears. She left without speaking to reporters. Scott was pregnant with Page's child at the time of Nyia's killing, and the couple was raising another of Scott's children.

"You thought I was supposed to die. You and T-Rex and your 900-pound gorilla couldn't kill me. That's what makes me go every day," Page told Cashman and Deputy District Attorney Mark V. Tranquilli, who prosecuted the case. "It took you and this man and 12 jurors, and you still didn't kill me. I'm going strong every day. Every day I'm going strong until I'm free."

An Allegheny County jury convicted Page of first-degree murder in March, but deadlocked 9-3 on whether Page should be executed. Page also was convicted of kidnapping, making false reports to police and aggravated indecent assault.

Page confessed he left the child outside and went back to bed. At trial, he testified that he fabricated the confession to tell police what they wanted to hear and to protect others in his family from being investigated.

Yesterday, Page referenced that he "said some very stupid things and got myself in trouble."

Tranquilli said he wasn't surprised at the outburst.

"I think it was calculated to upset Nyia's mother," Tranquilli said. "Prison is not a good place for people who sexually assault and kill their own children. He will fight every day, but not for his innocence."

Page's attorney, Chris Patarini, said he expected an outburst.

"The things he said are consistent with him maintaining his innocence," Patarini said.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.