TribLIVE

| Home

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Report: Jefferson Hills hospital fails to disclose infections

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

By Walter F. Roche Jr.
Wednesday, Dec. 15, 2010
 

Jefferson Regional Medical Center failed to promptly report 38 cases of hospital-acquired infections to the state Patient Safety Authority, according to the state Health Department.

A 17-page report the agency posted online this weekend says inspectors found that during two months this year, the hospital failed to report infections within 24 hours, as required under state law, and failed to promptly inform the 38 affected patients.

The report concluded that the 373-bed Jefferson Hills facility was out of compliance with licensing rules.

The hospital implemented a plan to remedy administrative deficiencies the report noted, Jefferson spokeswoman Candy Williams said in an e-mailed response to questions.

"Jefferson Regional Medical Center is fully licensed, and at no point has the license been in jeopardy," Williams said.

Records from May and September showed no documentation of when officials reported the 38 cases as required under MCARE, the Medical Care Availability and Reduction of Error Act. The law requires reporting of serious medical events within 24 hours of their detection and says hospital officials must notify affected patients within seven days of confirmation.

The licensure inspection took place Nov. 1.

The inspectors said Jefferson employees told them they were unaware of the requirement to report serious events that compromise patient safety within 24 hours and that they fell behind in filing required reports in May.

The inspectors cited Jefferson for failing to conduct criminal background checks on new employees who were likely to have contact with children. The checks are required under a Pennsylvania law that took effect July 1, 2008.

The report states 11 records for employees hired after that date did not show the required checks. In its corrective plan, Jefferson promised to conduct reviews on current and future employees.

The report also cited Jefferson for failing to obtain informed consent from patients who underwent invasive procedures performed by a radiological assistant. Williams said hospital employees obtained consent but did not always document that.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Stories

  1. Penguins trade Sutter to Canucks, sign free agent center Fehr
  2. Le’Veon Bell’s suspension cut by one game
  3. Pitt’s Blair faces court date on DUI charge
  4. Five Baldwin men face trial in beating of black man
  5. Brady’s suspension upheld by Goodell
  6. Videos spur dozens to protest outside Pittsburgh Planned Parenthood
  7. Judge lets New Kensington Ten Commandments monument stand
  8. Steelers RB Archer trying to catch up after tough rookie season
  9. IOC urges US to come up with another bid city for 2024 Games
  10. Inside the Steelers: Ventrone suffers right ankle injury
  11. Indiana County hazmat crews treat nearly two dozen workers for cadmium exposure at Homer City plant