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Save money by buying refurbished iPad

| Saturday, Oct. 6, 2012, 9:00 p.m.

Q I'd like to buy a new iPad, but I want to save a little cash. Is there any way to buy a new iPad online for less?

A Apple has a refurbished gadget program that can save you about $50 on the new iPad. It will still come with the same one-year warranty that the brand-new ones come with. You can shop on Amazon and eBay for used iPads, too. Double check the going price on Gazelle. Just make sure the seller has a good reputation before you buy, and make sure it has a warranty. Then, if you don't need to have the latest and greatest gadget, you can buy the iPad 2. It's still a solid tablet and is $100 cheaper than the new iPad. When you buy it refurbished from Apple, you'll save even more.

Q I'd like to turn my monitor into a touch screen to take advantage of Windows 8. Is there any software that can do this?

A Not really. Turning a non-touch screen monitor into a touch screen requires a hardware fix. The kits can cost $100 or less, but attempt it only if you know what you're doing. You will void your monitor's warranty. You can buy touch-screen overlays for your monitor that will give your monitor some touch-screen features. However, these can cost just as much or more than buying a new touch-screen monitor. Because of that, I recommend just buying a touch-screen monitor if you want to cash in on Window 8's touch-screen features. Expect to pay about $300.

Q I have a business I'd like to advertise on Facebook. How do I set up a Facebook business profile?

A The process is very similar to creating a regular Facebook profile. Go to the Facebook home page and click “Create a page for a celebrity, band or business” in the bottom right. Then, Facebook will walk you through inputting all of your business's vital information. Make sure you include a business-specific phone number and email address, so you don't confuse personal and business contacts. Include plenty of pictures and other fun stuff to make people see your page as less of a business and more as a friend. I've got a ton of tips to make the most of a business Facebook page.

Q I just moved to a new city and I'm trying to find hotspots around town. What are some ways to find free Wi-Fi?

A If you've already set up cable Internet in your home, you may have access to thousands of hotspots. Go to your ISP's website and type in your ZIP code. You could find dozens of cool places with free Wi-Fi to check out. Some cable providers allow other company's customers to use their hotspots with no charge, too. This is called the Cable Wi-Fi project, so you check to see if your ISP is one of its members. If not, you can still find dozens of hotspots around town with the JiWire Wi-Fi finder. It organizes hotspots by price, so you'll always know if there's free Wi-Fi or not.

Kim Komando hosts the nation's largest talk radio show about consumer electronics, computers and the Internet. To get the podcast, watch the show or find the station nearest you, visit www.komando.com.

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