Share This Page

Chatham breaks ground for Richland expansion

| Friday, Oct. 12, 2012, 12:33 a.m.
Arist rendition of the Phase 1 project - On October 11, Chatham University breaks ground on the $40 million initial phase of its new Eden Hall Campus in Richland, Pa. The new campus will be the first academic community in the world built from the ground up for sustainable development, living, and learning. The initial stage of construction consists of the development of field labs, classrooms, a dining hall, a café, an amphitheater, a mosaic garden, and infrastructure development to be complete by fall 2013. Two residence halls supporting 150 beds are scheduled for completion in 2015.
Arist rendition of Eden Hall Amphitheater - On October 11, Chatham University breaks ground on the $40 million initial phase of its new Eden Hall Campus in Richland, Pa. The new campus will be the first academic community in the world built from the ground up for sustainable development, living, and learning. The initial stage of construction consists of the development of field labs, classrooms, a dining hall, a café, an amphitheater, a mosaic garden, and infrastructure development to be complete by fall 2013. Two residence halls supporting 150 beds are scheduled for completion in 2015.
Arist rendition of Eden Hall Cafe / Dairy Barn - - On October 11, Chatham University breaks ground on the $40 million initial phase of its new Eden Hall Campus in Richland, Pa. The new campus will be the first academic community in the world built from the ground up for sustainable development, living, and learning. The initial stage of construction consists of the development of field labs, classrooms, a dining hall, a café, an amphitheater, a mosaic garden, and infrastructure development to be complete by fall 2013. Two residence halls supporting 150 beds are scheduled for completion in 2015.
Arist rendition of Eden Hall Field Lab - On October 11, Chatham University breaks ground on the $40 million initial phase of its new Eden Hall Campus in Richland, Pa. The new campus will be the first academic community in the world built from the ground up for sustainable development, living, and learning. The initial stage of construction consists of the development of field labs, classrooms, a dining hall, a café, an amphitheater, a mosaic garden, and infrastructure development to be complete by fall 2013. Two residence halls supporting 150 beds are scheduled for completion in 2015.

Chatham University ceremoniously broke ground on Thursday for its 388-acre Eden Hall campus in Richland.

Esther Barazzone, president of the Shadyside-based university, led a group of public officials and school trustees as they donned hard hats and simultaneously plunged shiny shovels into a line of dirt.

S. Murray Rust III, chairman of Chatham's board of trustees, said the rural second campus on Ridge Road is “an opportunity to reinvent ourselves.”

Chatham hopes to eventually construct more than 30 buildings on the former farm of the late Sebastian Mueller, a German immigrant and H.J. Heinz Co. executive who charitably made his estate a retreat for Pittsburgh's working women.

Four years ago, the Eden Hall Foundation donated the land for Chatham's new School of Sustainability and the Environment.

A $7.5 million gift from the Richard King Mellon Foundation — announced in conjunction with the groundbreaking ceremony — is part of the $28.6 million raised to help establish the new school.

“We're all humbled and honored to help educate a new crop of innovators for many growing seasons to come,” said David Goldberg, president of Mithun, the architectural firm that designed the new Eden Hall campus buildings.

Also attending the groundbreaking were Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald; state Sen. Randy Vulakovich, R-Shaler; Mary Ann Eisenreich, director of the governor's southwest Pennsylvania office; Richland Supervisor Herb Dankmyer; and trustee John Mazur of the Eden Hall Foundation.

The groundbreaking officially kicked off the Eden Hall campus's first phase of development and $40 million in building projects that are planned.

The first phase includes a field lab with classrooms, outdoor amphitheater, a mosaic-style garden and constructed wetlands containing cattails that will be part of an on-site wastewater treatment system.

Deborah Deasy is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 724-772-6369 or ddeasy@tribweb.com.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.