TribLIVE

| Home


Weather Forecast
 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Jobless claims fall to 339K, fewest in years

About The Tribune-Review
The Tribune-Review can be reached via e-mail or at 412-321-6460.
Contact Us | Video | Photo Reprints

Daily Photo Galleries


By The Associated Press

Published: Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012, 6:04 p.m.

WASHINGTON — Declining applications for unemployment benefits have typically pointed to stronger hiring.

Not so much now.

Since the recession officially ended in June 2009, fewer layoffs have meant fewer people seeking unemployment aid. On Thursday, for example, the government said first-time applications for benefits hit a 4½-year low.

Yet job growth remains sluggish. That was evident last week in the government's jobs report for September. A survey of employers showed that they added a modest 114,000 jobs last month.

And the unemployment rate, based on a separate survey of households, sank in August to 7.8 percent from 8.1 percent.

If fewer people are being laid off, why aren't employers hiring more?

Blame the slow pace of the U.S. economy, damage from Europe's economic crisis and fear that tax increases and spending cuts could trigger another U.S. recession next year.

Many companies have said they lack confidence that the U.S. economy will strengthen enough in coming months to justify hiring now.

“The relationship between claims and jobs has been less strong during this recovery than in past post-war recoveries,” said Drew Matus, an economist at UBS. “There's a hiring problem out there, as opposed to a layoff problem.”

Even last week's sharp drop in people seeking unemployment benefits came with a cautionary note.

Applications fell 30,000 to 339,000, the fewest since February 2008. And the four-week average, a less volatile gauge, reached a six-month low.

A Labor Department spokesman said one large state accounted for much of the drop in applications for aid.

The spokesman didn't identify the state, but several economists speculated that it was California.

The long-term trend in applications for unemployment benefits has been steadily down, though it has leveled off since spring.

When the economic recovery officially began in June 2009, an average of about 600,000 people were filing first-time claims for benefits each week. For nearly a year, that figure has remained consistently below 400,000.

But the decline hasn't correlated with robust job growth, as it did in past economic recoveries. Many economists say they're not ready to predict a strengthening job market.

“We're going to wait for some corroborating data,” said Dan Greenhaus, chief market strategist at BTIG LLC.

The number of people who continue to receive unemployment benefits has fallen. Slightly more than 5 million Americans received benefits in the week that ended Sept. 22, the latest period for which figures are available. That's down about 44,000 from the previous week.

But some people who no longer receive aid have likely used up all the benefits available to them.

The 114,000 jobs employers added in September are roughly enough to keep pace with population growth. They aren't enough, though, to provide work for the more than 12 million unemployed Americans.

And most of the job increases last month came from those who had to settle for part-time work: In September, 582,000 more people than in August said they were working part-time but wanted full-time jobs.

The economy did gain an average of 146,000 jobs a month in the July-September quarter — more than twice the monthly pace in the April-June quarter.

Still, another government report this week added to signs that hiring will likely remain modest: Employers advertised slightly fewer open jobs in August than in July. It was the second consecutive monthly drop. And the number of posted openings was the fewest since April.

A major problem is the U.S. economy isn't growing fast enough to generate significant hiring. Economic growth slowed to a tepid annual rate of 1.3 percent in the April-June quarter. That was down from a 2 percent annual rate in the previous quarter.

Most economists foresee growth staying at or below 2 percent in the second half of the year.

 

 
 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Stories

  1. Jailed Hribal ‘fine,’ but family ‘terrible’ as answers in stabbing sought
  2. Starkey: Fleury’s future at stake
  3. Five years later, Crosby wants another Cup win
  4. Pirates notebook: Wandy Rodriguez experiencing decline in fastball velocity
  5. Penguins’ Malkin expects to play in Game 1
  6. Pitt wraps up spring football practice with closeness, competition
  7. Hempfield Area superintendent, business manager quit
  8. Obama, Biden to announce $500M for job training grants during W.Pa. visit
  9. Pirates conclude wild suspended game with win, drop 2nd of series
  10. Obama, Biden to announce $500M for job training grants during W.Pa. visit
  11. South Fayette parents express dissatisfaction with handling of bullying
Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.