TribLIVE

| Home

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Taliban victim, 14, changes hospitals

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

By Reuters
Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012, 9:21 p.m.
 

PESHAWAR, Pakistan — A Pakistani schoolgirl fighting for her life upon being shot by the Taliban for campaigning for education rights and speaking out against the militants was transferred on Thursday from a hospital in a province that is a militant haven to a specialist hospital in the army garrison town of Rawalpindi.

Malala Yousufzai, 14, was unconscious in critical condition because gunmen shot her in the head and neck as she left school on Tuesday, but doctors said she had moved her arms and legs slightly the night before.

Pakistani surgeons removed a bullet on Wednesday from Yousufzai.

Her courage made her a national hero.

The shooting has drawn condemnation from world leaders and many Pakistanis.

Yousufzai began standing up to the Pakistani Taliban when she was 11, when the government had effectively ceded control of the Swat Valley, where she lives, to the Taliban.

Her father, Ziauddin Yousufzai, who runs a girls' school, said his daughter had defied threats for years, believing the good work she was doing for her community was her best protection.

A Reuters correspondent watched as she was moved from an army hospital in the regional capital of Peshawar to the Armed Forces Institute of Cardiology in Rawalpindi to help her treatment.

“Pray for her,” her distraught uncle, Faiz Mohammad, said before the ambulance left the hospital.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Stories

  1. Zimbabwe alleges Murrysville doctor illegally killed lion
  2. Rossi: Looking at the next great Steeler
  3. Ability to clog the trenches crucial to Steelers defense
  4. Steelers swap draft pick for Eagles cornerback
  5. After early criticism, Haley has Steelers offense poised to be even better
  6. Penguins not alone in top-heavy approach to salary cap
  7. EPA diktats: Pushing back
  8. Shell shovels millions into proposed Beaver County plant site
  9. Starting 9: Examining Pirates’ deadline decisions
  10. Pirates notebook: New acquisition Happ more than happy to fill spot in rotation
  11. Steelers notebook: Injuries finally become issue at training camp