Share This Page

One refined ride

| Friday, Nov. 9, 2012, 8:55 p.m.

If the all-new 2013 Acura ILX were the new kid in the 'hood, he might find himself up against a quizzical bunch.

Some would ask: Whatever happened to that other entry-level guy from Acura, the Integra? And the one that followed, the RSX? And some might suggest that he looks awfully familiar — a lot like his kin, the Honda Civic.

Just who are you, anyway?

Well, the ILX would say he's the newest gateway to the Acura brand. Acura folks hope it serves to introduce the brand to those who want a bit more refinement with their fun, and then maybe will stay with the brand down the road when they have more money to spend.

While it gets its platform from the ninth-generation Honda Civic and inherits a good number of its parts, the ILX is slightly wider and longer, has engineering all its own and an interior that is striking and says anything but Civic.

Up front it has its own rendition of Acura's pointy-nosed grille, a lower roofline than the Civic and inflated rear fenders that give it a broader look.

And, once on the road, the ILX's upgraded chassis (for better handling) and more responsive steering will make you forget it's even related to the Civic.

Improvements have been made, too, to make this ride quieter than the less expensive subcompacts. Here's hoping engineers will go back to the drawing board; there's still a fair amount of the road noise to contend with on the highway.

The standard powerplant is a 2.0-liter, inline 4-cylinder that generates 150 horses and 140 pound-feet of torque. Speed is regulated by a smooth-shifting 5-speed automatic tranny. Zero to 60 takes a somewhat leisurely 9 seconds, but it's no worse than half the other guys in the segment.

Mileage figures to be around 24 mpg city, and as much as 35 on the open road.

For more kick, go for the 2.4-liter engine — same one that's in the sprightly Civic Si — that generates 201 hp and comes with a smooth six-speed manual shifter. The 2.4 clips a full two seconds off the zero-to-60 and sacrifices only a few mpg.

For the tree-hugging purists, Acura has a hybrid, featuring a 1.5-liter engine coupled with an electric motor and a CVT (continuously variable transmission). Power dips to 111 hp but fuel economy jumps to around 38 mpg. Tip: If it's hybrid economy you seek, there are others that offer even better mileage — the Civic hybrid, to name one.

On the twisty roads, you'll find the ILX to be eager and confident, taking corners without argument and staying flat.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.