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Squirrel Hill park dedicated in honor of deceased developer

| Saturday, Oct. 27, 2012, 5:24 p.m.
As friends and family look on, the daughter of Mark Schneider, Ryan Schneider (left), smiles as she is given a proclamation about her father at a dedication for the new Schneider Park in Summerset at Frick Park in Squirrel Hill, Saturday, October 27th, 2012. The park was dedicated to Schneider to honor the civic leader who died earlier this year. At far right is Schneider's father, Clem, who traveled to the dedication from Ohio. Keith Hodan | Tribune-Review
Children in costume march through the neighborhood of Summerset at Frick Park in Squirrel Hill, Saturday, October 27th, 2012. The parade was part of the day's festivities, which included a park dedication and a fall festival. Keith Hodan | Tribune-Review
A dedication was held for Schneider Park in Summerset at Frick Park in Squirrel Hill, Saturday, October 27th, 2012. The park was dedicated to Mark Schneider, to honor the civic leader who died earlier this year. Keith Hodan | Tribune-Review

A park in Summerset at Frick Park now bears the name of late Pittsburgh developer Mark C. Schneider, a central figure in the Squirrel Hill redevelopment project.

“It was an extraordinarily complicated endeavor,” said Craig Dunham, project manager for Summerset Land Development Associates.

He said Schneider, 55, who died in a bike accident July 29, was key in assembling a partnership behind the urban-renewal. The project, 15 years in the making, built residences for more than 265 families, with several hundred more expected.

Schneider's loved ones and colleagues joined elected officials Saturday in dedicating a new park near Beardsley and Biltmore lanes in his honor. The private park, open to the public, covers about a third of an acre and features benches and a bicycle rack, a nod to Schneider's passion for cycling.

City Council member Bill Peduto called Schenider a major contributor to Pittsburgh's overall revitalization, saying he helped forge the reuse of “shuttered sites from our industrial past to create world-class developments.”

Also Saturday, Summerset leaders announced the construction of a 131-unit rental community in the neighborhood. It will be ready for occupancy in April 2013, they said.

A fall festival, starting with a parade through Summerset, followed the park dedication.

Adam Smeltz is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-380-5676 or asmeltz@tribweb.com.

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