TribLIVE

| Home

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Apple goes with minimalist vision

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

On the Grid

From the shale fields to the cooling towers, Trib Total Media covers the energy industry in Western Pennsylvania and beyond. For the latest news and views on gas, coal, electricity and more, check out On the Grid today.

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

By Bloomberg News
Saturday, Nov. 3, 2012, 9:03 p.m.
 

As Jony Ive worked on early iPhone designs before and since its 2007 introduction, he regularly held meetings in his design studio to get input from top Apple Inc. executives — except one: Scott Forstall.

Even as Forstall oversaw the group responsible for the software that would run the iPhone, he didn't participate in the meetings, according to people with knowledge of the matter who requested anonymity because the meetings were private. Ive and Forstall were rarely in same room, the people said.

Chief Executive Officer Tim Cook made a choice between the two men this week, forcing out Forstall and leaving Ive in charge of the look and function of the software running everything from the iPod Touch to the top-of-the-line Mac. Ive will be free to impart his minimalist aesthetic on familiar services such as the iPhone operating system while making commands more compatible from one product to the next. He will probably move away from using icons that look like real-world products, such as Post-It Notes and leather-bound contact books.

Still, with a background mainly in hardware, Ive could struggle to adapt to the demands of managing software interfaces, which are typically revamped once a year and undergo many smaller changes in between, said former colleagues such as Brett Halle.

“This makes a lot of sense, in terms of getting consistency of the user experience,” said Halle, a 21-year Apple veteran who worked on operating systems before his departure in March. “I'm concerned only as to whether he has enough experience to understand the complexity of the software side of this.”

Clashes between Forstall and other senior managers since co-founder Steve Jobs' death a year ago made it harder for teams to work together, threatening Apple's ability to keep producing the kinds of electronics that made it the most valuable company.

Jobs was able to keep the executives' long-simmering tension under control. Cook made the final decision to revamp management after Forstall refused to sign a public apology for the mishandling of mapping software, sources said.

Ive, 45, takes on the role Jobs held of setting Apple's design vision, with responsibility for a group within Apple called Human Interface, which had been run by Forstall before he was pushed out. Ive shares the attention to detail and perfectionistic zeal that characterized both Jobs and Forstall.

Yet he contrasts with Forstall in key ways. Forstall was a polished presenter who enjoyed the limelight at Apple keynotes. Ive made rare appearances, preferring instead to appear in videos about the making of the product of the day.

Forstall was also the most divisive member of Apple's executive team, people who worked with him told Bloomberg Businessweek last year.

Supporters admire Forstall's ability to manage massive technical complexity while pushing his team to innovate. Critics said he was overly concerned with empire building and pushing through favored features while blocking other teams' ideas. British-born Ive is known for his deliberate choice of words, and for crediting team members while minimizing his own role.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Stories

  1. Reissue of book of album covers by Andy Warhol shows many sides of his art
  2. Pirates third baseman Ramirez’s last ride is about winning a ring
  3. Dollars and sense: High cost of child care keeps many out of work force
  4. Woman ‘critical’ from fall on Harmar riverbank
  5. Former Cal U football player cleared of assault charges sues university, police, prosecutor
  6. Steelers QB Roethlisberger desires to be ‘Pittsburgh guy’
  7. Federal judge rules oil and gas lease for Washington County tract is valid
  8. Watering that garden right during summer’s high temperatures makes a difference
  9. Pa. House speaker says overriding Wolf’s budget veto ‘an option’
  10. Penguins to appear on national TV 18 times in 2015-16
  11. Higher hotel tax will benefit Pittsburgh