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Battered by storm, Staten Islanders feel forgotten

AP - Julie Traina tries to recover some personal items from the destroyed home of her parents in the Staten Island borough of New York, Friday, Nov. 2, 2012. A Superstorm Sandy relief fund is being created just for residents of the hard-hit New York City borough. Former Mayor Rudolph Giuliani and Borough President James Molinaro say the fund will help residents displaced from their homes. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>AP</em></div>Julie Traina tries to recover some personal items from the destroyed home of her parents in the Staten Island borough of New York, Friday, Nov. 2, 2012. A Superstorm Sandy relief fund is being created just for residents of the hard-hit New York City borough. Former Mayor Rudolph Giuliani and Borough President James Molinaro say the fund will help residents displaced from their homes. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
AP - Julie Traina tries to recover some personal items from the destroyed home of her parents in the Staten Island borough of New York, Friday, Nov. 2, 2012. A Superstorm Sandy relief fund is being created just for residents of the hard-hit New York City borough. Former Mayor Rudolph Giuliani and Borough President James Molinaro say the fund will help residents displaced from their homes. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>AP</em></div>Julie Traina tries to recover some personal items from the destroyed home of her parents in the Staten Island borough of New York, Friday, Nov. 2, 2012. A Superstorm Sandy relief fund is being created just for residents of the hard-hit New York City borough. Former Mayor Rudolph Giuliani and Borough President James Molinaro say the fund will help residents displaced from their homes. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
AP - National Guard soldiers unload water as hundreds of people from Superstorm Sandy wait in line for food distribution at Surf Avenue and 25th Street on Friday, Nov. 2, 2012 in Coney Island, in the Brooklyn borough of New York. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>AP</em></div>National Guard soldiers unload water as hundreds of people from Superstorm Sandy wait in line for food distribution at Surf Avenue and 25th Street on Friday, Nov. 2, 2012 in Coney Island, in the Brooklyn borough of New York.  (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

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By The Associated Press
Friday, Nov. 2, 2012, 10:06 p.m.
 

NEW YORK — Gazing at her bungalow, swept from its foundation and tossed across the street, Janice Clarkin wondered if help would ever come to this battered island off the coast of Manhattan.

“Do you see anybody here?” she asked, resignation etched on her face. “On the news, the mayor's congratulating the governor and the governor's congratulating the mayor. About what? People died.”

Staten Island was devastated beyond recognition by superstorm Sandy and suffered the highest death toll of all of New York City's boroughs, including two young brothers who were swept from their mother's arms by the swirling sea and drowned. Yet days since the waters receded, residents feel ignored and forgotten.

That sense of isolation is deeply rooted on Staten Island, a tight-knit community that has long felt cut off from the bright lights of Manhattan.

“It's always been that way. We're a forgotten little island,” said Catherine Friscia, who stood across the street from the Atlantic Ocean in front of homes filled with water and where the air smelled like garbage and rotting fish.

“Nobody pays attention to any of us over here.”

In the shadow of the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge, dazed survivors roamed Staten Island's sand-covered streets amid ruined bungalows sagging under the weight of water that rose to the rooftops. Their contents lay flung in the street: Mud-soaked couches, stuffed animals and mattresses formed towering piles of wreckage. Boats were tossed like toys into roadways.

Residents washed their muddy hands with bottled water and handed out sandwiches to neighbors as they sifted through the soggy wreckage of their homes, searching for anything that could be salvaged. Spray-painted on the plywood that covered the first floor of one flooded home were the words: “FEMA CALL ME.”

Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano visited Staten Island on Friday, touring a shelter and a Red Cross distribution center where storm victims lined up to get food, water and clothing. A short distance away, a long line of cars snaked down the street, waiting to get to one of the few gas stations with fuel.

“We know that Staten Island took a particularly hard hit from Sandy, so we want to make sure that the right resources are brought here as quickly as possible to help this community, which is so very strong, recover even more quickly,” said Napolitano, who was joined by Red Cross CEO Gail McGovern and Staten Island Borough President James Molinaro, who a day earlier had sharply criticized what he said was the Red Cross's inadequate response in Staten Island.

Sticking together in the aftermath of the storm has kept Staten Islanders who lost everything from completely falling apart. Self-reliance is in their blood — just as the island's very geography lends itself to a feeling of isolation from the mainland: the only way to get on or off is by car, bus or ferry.

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