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David Feherty draws crowds to charity event at LeMont

| Sunday, Nov. 11, 2012, 8:53 p.m.
From left, Rick Kell, David Feherty, and Jim Smail at the Troops First Foundation dinner at the LeMont Wednesday, November 7, 2012. Heidi Murrin Pittsburgh Tribune-Review
Bill and Tricia Kassling at the Troops First Foundation dinner at the LeMont Wednesday, November 7, 2012. Heidi Murrin Pittsburgh Tribune-Review
Summer and Duffy Friedlander at the Troops First Foundation dinner at the LeMont Wednesday, November 7, 2012. Heidi Murrin Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

Swooning is usually reserved for tweens, twerps and the rest of the teenybopper throng.

That is, until you put a roomful of grown men and women in a room with David Feherty, God's gift of razor-sharp repartee to the world of golf.

Dinner with the man, the myth, the legend drew more than 250 on Wednesday to LeMont at $1,000 a pop, although neither price tags nor mileage could stymie anyone's interest.

“We get the ‘Most Miles Traveled' award,” mused Bruno Burlon, whose entourage included seven others from Toronto.

Reaping the rewards was Feherty's Troops First Foundation, which seeks to improve the lives of our soldiers — particularly those dealing with devastating injuries from tours in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Spearheaded by Jim Smail (with Nancy), the evening drew the likes of Tom andTina Henderson, Jeff Revilla, Richard Kacin, co-chairs Bill andTricia Kassling, Tony andAnita Perricelli, Kim andLee Tilghman, T1F executive director Rick Kell, and Dr. Stephen and Linda Todorovich.

“Every now and then, you come across a community that really cares and seems to get it...this town gets it,” Feherty said.

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