Share This Page

UK lawmaker suspended for joining reality TV show

| Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012, 9:10 a.m.

LONDON -- A British lawmaker was suspended by her party Tuesday after she swapped the political jungle for the Australian rainforest and became a contestant on a reality TV show.

Conservative legislator Nadine Dorries was under fire for taking part in "I'm a Celebrity ... Get Me Out of Here." The show strands C-list celebrities in the Australian wilderness, subjects them to trials involving assorted creepy-crawlies and lets viewers vote them off one by one.

The Conservatives, who lead Britain's coalition government, said Dorries was being suspended from the party's parliamentary caucus until she could return and meet with Chief Whip George Young, who is responsible for party discipline.

Dorries was criticized by fellow Conservatives for taking up to a month off from her duties to appear on the show. Former Conservative member of Parliament Harry Greenway called the decision "outrageous," and Home Secretary Theresa May said a lawmaker's job "is in their constituency and in the House of Commons."

But Conservative commentator Tim Montgomerie said appearing on the show, which begins Sunday, could help Dorries "present an image of a Tory MP that defies some of the popular preconceptions and caricatures."

It could also backfire.

In 2006, George Galloway, a lawmaker with the small Respect party, appeared on the TV show "Celebrity Big Brother" - and was widely mocked for escapades that included performing interpretive dance dressed in a red leotard and lapping imaginary milk while pretending to be a cat.

Dorries is an outspoken backbencher, best known for her prolific blogging and attempt to restrict access to late-term abortions.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.