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A time for truth on Petraeus and Benghazi

| Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2012, 8:59 p.m.

The stunning resignation of CIA Director David Petraeus, days before he was to testify on the CIA role in the Benghazi massacre, raises many more questions than his resignation letter answers.

Petraeus' adultery with a married mother of two, Paula Broadwell, began soon after he became director in 2011. Was his security detail at the CIA and were his closest associates oblivious to the fact that the director was a ripe target for blackmail, since any revelation of the affair could destroy his career?

People at the CIA had to know they had a security risk at the top of their agency. Did no one at the CIA do anything?

By early summer, however, Jill Kelley, 37, a close friend of the general from his days as head of CentCom at MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa, Fla., had received half a dozen anonymous, jealous, threatening emails.

Yet, learning that Broadwell was the source of the emails, that Petraeus was having an affair with her and that the CIA director was thus a target for blackmail and a security risk should have taken three days for the FBI, not three months.

Was the CIA aware that Petraeus' private emails were being read by the FBI?

Surely, as soon as Petraeus' affair became known, FBI Director Robert Mueller would have been told and would have alerted Attorney General Eric Holder, who would have alerted the president.

For a matter of such gravity, this is normal procedure. Yet, The New York Times says the FBI and the Justice Department kept the White House in the dark.

Is that believable?

Today, closed Senate hearings are being held into unanswered questions about the terrorist attack in which Ambassador Chris Stevens, two former Navy SEALs and a U.S. diplomat were killed.

There are four basic questions:

• Why were repeated warnings from Benghazi about terrorist activity in the area ignored?

• Why was the U.S. military unable to come to the rescue of our people begging for help?

• Who, if anyone, gave an order for forces to “stand down” and not go to the rescue of the consulate compound or the safe house?

• Why, when the CIA knew it was a terrorist attack, did everyone from President Obama to U.N. Ambassador Susan Rice blame an anti-Islamic video?

President Nixon's Attorneys General John Mitchell and Richard Kleindienst and his top aides Bob Haldeman and John Ehrlichman were all subpoenaed by the Watergate Committee and made to testify under oath about a bungled bugging at the DNC.

The Benghazi massacre is a far graver matter, and the country deserves answers.

The country deserves the truth.

Pat Buchanan is the author of “Suicide of a Superpower: Will America Survive to 2025?”

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