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Revitalization grants go to a dozen groups in Pittsburgh

| Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2012, 3:38 p.m.

The first round of Pittsburgh Neighborhood Renaissance Fund grants, ranging from $10,000 to $50,000, went to 12 organizations on Tuesday.

The fund's goal is to give recipients the expertise and guidance to pursue real estate development projects and other initiatives.

Here are the grants:

• $25,000 to West End Alliance to study the reuse of a closed and vacant school

• $15,000 to Pittsburgh Musical Theater for façade improvements and expansion at its West End location

• $15,000 to Central Northside Neighborhood Council for sign and gateway design for its Allegheny City Central branding plan

• $15,000 to Troy Hill Citizens for implementation of their park plan and programming

• $25,000 to Community Alliance of Spring Garden-East Deutschtown for gateway design at the Route 28 exit at the 16th Street Bridge

• $25,000 to Brookline SPDC for a market study and branding for Brookline Boulevard

• $15,000 to Beltzhoover Civic Association for parklet design and construction on a historic streetcar turnaround site

• $35,000 to Hilltop Alliance to eliminate blight and reduce foreclosures in the south Hilltop communities

• $50,000 to Economic Development South for a destination “dairy district” on Brownsville Road in Carrick

• $18,725 to Polish Hill Civic Association for a mixed use plan for Brereton-Dobson site of two vacant lots and four deteriorating, fire-damaged houses

• $10,000 to Focus on Renewal/Ujamaa Collective for Centre Avenue development in the Hill District

• $25,000 to Point Breeze North Development Corp. for Simonton Street study for infill housing and corridor design

The amount awarded totals almost $275,000. A start-up grant of $300,000 established the fund. Local foundations and other sources have provided matching grants.

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