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'Jack Reacher' to make its U.S. debut Dec. 15 in Pittsburgh

| Monday, Nov. 26, 2012, 1:22 p.m.
MTV.com
“Jack Reacher” stars Tom Cruise as Jack Reacher in the Pittsburgh-made movie originally called “One Shot.” He looks pretty tough as he stands on 9th Street with the Rachel Carson Bridge in the background.
Paramount Pictures
Tom Cruise stars in 'Jack Reacher'

Tom Cruise will return to Pittsburgh on Dec. 15 for a red-carpet showing of “Jack Reacher” at the SouthSide Works Cinema. But the even bigger news may be that the event will be the U.S. premiere for the film, an action-thriller that shot in the Pittsburgh region late last year.

“Jack Reacher” is set for nationwide release Dec. 21.

Paramount Pictures contacted the Pittsburgh Film Office to say they wanted to hold the premiere in Pittsburgh, film office director Dawn Keezer says. As far as she can remember, this is the first time since she's been in the job that the city has hosted a bona fide premiere of a major film.

“It's a phenomenal opportunity for the Pittsburgh region to celebrate the film industry,” she said. “We've never had that happen, complete with the red carpet, the movie lights, everything.”

Cast members Robert Duvall and Rosamund Pike also have RSVP'd yes for the 'Burgh bash. So has Lee Child, a British-born writer based in New York. His novel “One Shot,” which features the character of Jack Reacher, an ex-army investigator turned private detective, is the basis for the film. Child has written several Reacher novels.

The film moves the action from Indiana to Pittsburgh. Scenes were filmed in Oakmont, the Allegheny County Courthouse and on the North Shore, among other places.

“Jack Reacher” stars Cruise as the title character. He is asked to help defend an ex-military sniper who is accused of gunning down five unarmed people, apparently at random. Reacher reluctantly agrees to investigate and soon discovers alarming evidence of a cover up.

“Jack Reacher” also features Richard Jenkins, “True Blood's” Michael Raymond-James, David Oyelowo, Jai Courtney and Werner Herzog, the eccentric German film director better known for his work on the other side of the camera.

“We had an extraordinary experience shooting in Pittsburgh,” said Christopher McQuarrie, who directed the film. “The local crew was fantastic, and the city was unbelievably accommodating. We felt very welcome — even with all the noise we made.”

William Loeffler is staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at wloeffler@tribweb.com and 412-320-7986.

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