Share This Page

Beaver Falls senior named finalist for U.S. Army-Pro Football Hall of Fame honor

| Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2012, 11:40 p.m.
From left, Maj. Gen. David Mann, Joe Dixon, Lynn Swann and George Veras from the Pro Football Hall of Fame pose for photos at Beaver Falls last week while Dixon was named one of 10 finalists for the U.S. Army-Pro Football Hall of Fame Award for Excellence. Submitted

As Angela Manno went through the list of criteria, Joe Dixon became an obvious choice.

A guidance counselor at Beaver Falls High School, Manno was compelled to nominate a student for the U.S. Army and Pro Football Hall of Fame's Award for Excellence. Dixon, a senior at Beaver Falls, proved worthy on all fronts.

“Honestly, he always strives to do his best in anything he does,” Manno said.

Dixon's academic achievement, his status as a two-sport athlete and his lengthy record of community service earned him a visit from Steelers Hall of Fame receiver Lynn Swann and Army Maj. Gen. David Mann for a ceremony and presentation at Beaver Falls last week.

Dixon was selected as one of 10 national finalists for the Army/Hall of Fame Award of Excellence.

Dixon, who participates in track and field and golf for Beaver Falls, has a 4.0 weighted GPA.

He will join the other nine national finalists to participate in activities at the 2013 U.S. Army All-American Bowl in San Antonio. The inaugural winner will be announced Jan. 4.

“Getting to the (Pro Football Hall of Fame) is all about getting on the road to excellence,” Swann said in a statement.

Dixon is involved with National Honors Society, Key Club and the St. Cecelia Church's CCD religious education program. According to Manno, Dixon has taken part in community service such as making Christmas cards and Valentine's Day cards for the elderly, breakfast with Santa for underprivileged children, a Thanksgiving food drive and other Salvation Army activities.

Dixon also was the top fundraiser for breast cancer awareness in October and participated in the Teens for Jeans initiative in the spring.

“My parents raised me to help people when you can, and I kind of took a liking to it myself,” Dixon said. “I really enjoy being able to make someone's day better.”

Dixon hasn't chosen a college yet, but he plans on studying computer science.

“The way I look at it, anything I ever really put my mind to, I'm going to do my best at,” Dixon said. “I don't like to slack or anything.”

Chris Adamski is a freelance writer.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.