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Deals site LivingSocial cuts 400 jobs

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By The Associated Press
Friday, Nov. 30, 2012, 12:01 a.m.
 

NEW YORK — Online deals company LivingSocial is cutting 400 jobs worldwide, or about 9 percent of its workforce, as the deals market continues to face challenges.

LivingSocial spokesman Andrew Weinstein said on Thursday that all but a few dozen of the cuts are in the United States. The company's sales force had the highest number of cuts, while others are in customer service and editorial, the people paid to write up the deals.

LivingSocial said it is moving its customer service operations to Tucson from Washington, where it has its headquarters.

Weinstein said the job cuts came as part of a review of LivingSocial's global operations. The review was designed to make sure the company has the resources it needs to invest in areas that are “critical to the future,” such as marketing and mobile, he said.

Over the past year or so, online deals have gone from fad to a much-copied business model that's easy to set up but difficult to sustain. LivingSocial is one of the largest of the online deals companies, behind No. 1 Groupon Inc.

The job cuts came a day after Groupon CEO Andrew Mason said that “it would be weird” if his board was not discussing whether he was the right person for the job amid the company's poor stock performance.

His possible ouster was reported by AllThingsD and elsewhere.

Groupon's stock fell 2 cents to $4.40 in afternoon trading Thursday. The Chicago-based company went public in November 2011 at $20 per share. Earlier this month, Groupon reported a small loss for its third quarter. While its revenue grew by a third, it wasn't as high as Wall Street had hoped due largely to the weak economy in Europe.

Groupon's growth rate has steadily declined: In the fourth quarter of 2011, in its first earnings report as a public company, Groupon said its revenue nearly tripled. That fell to 89 percent in the first quarter of this year, 45 percent in the second quarter and 32 percent in the third.

Amazon.com Inc. has a small stake in LivingSocial, which is a privately held company.

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