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Immigration in America

| Saturday, March 31, 2018, 7:54 a.m.
In this Oct. 28, 1956 file photo, Mr. and Mrs. Paul Roerich from Bavaria, Germany, look out from the stern of the USNS General Langfitt anchored in New York Harbor carrying 1,267 refugees from Europe. In the background is the Statue of Liberty. The couple plan to settle in Ohio. The American self-image is forever intertwined with the melting pot _ a nation that embraces the world’s wretched refuse, a nation built by immigrants. But America’s immigration history is complicated. (AP Photo/File)
In this Oct. 28, 1956 file photo, Mr. and Mrs. Paul Roerich from Bavaria, Germany, look out from the stern of the USNS General Langfitt anchored in New York Harbor carrying 1,267 refugees from Europe. In the background is the Statue of Liberty. The couple plan to settle in Ohio. The American self-image is forever intertwined with the melting pot _ a nation that embraces the world’s wretched refuse, a nation built by immigrants. But America’s immigration history is complicated. (AP Photo/File)
IIn this Thursday, Sept. 17, 2015 file photo, students from Public School 3 in Jersey City, N.J., wave flags representing the nations of origin of immigrants who became U.S. citizens during a ceremony at Liberty State Park in Jersey City, N.J. Constitution Day and Citizenship Day is celebrated each year on Sept. 17, on the anniversary of the signing of the Constitution in 1787. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)
IIn this Thursday, Sept. 17, 2015 file photo, students from Public School 3 in Jersey City, N.J., wave flags representing the nations of origin of immigrants who became U.S. citizens during a ceremony at Liberty State Park in Jersey City, N.J. Constitution Day and Citizenship Day is celebrated each year on Sept. 17, on the anniversary of the signing of the Constitution in 1787. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)
This 1924 file photo shows the registry room at Ellis Island in New York harbor, a gateway to America for millions of immigrants. The American self-image is forever intertwined with the melting pot _ a nation that embraces the world’s wretched refuse, a nation built by immigrants. But America’s immigration history is complicated. (AP Photo/File)
This 1924 file photo shows the registry room at Ellis Island in New York harbor, a gateway to America for millions of immigrants. The American self-image is forever intertwined with the melting pot _ a nation that embraces the world’s wretched refuse, a nation built by immigrants. But America’s immigration history is complicated. (AP Photo/File)
In this April 7, 1949 file photo, three Finnish children write 'America' on a chalkboard in a class held for children of immigrants detained at Ellis Island in New York City. They range in ages 3 to 11 years old. The American self-image is forever intertwined with the melting pot _ a nation that embraces the world’s wretched refuse, a nation built by immigrants. But America’s immigration history is complicated. (AP Photo)
In this April 7, 1949 file photo, three Finnish children write 'America' on a chalkboard in a class held for children of immigrants detained at Ellis Island in New York City. They range in ages 3 to 11 years old. The American self-image is forever intertwined with the melting pot _ a nation that embraces the world’s wretched refuse, a nation built by immigrants. But America’s immigration history is complicated. (AP Photo)
In this Aug. 11, 1951 file photo, U.S. Border Patrol inspectors Fred H. Voight, left, and Gordon MacDonald, right, both from the El Centro U.S. Border Patrol sector headquarters, search two Mexican nationals, Pedro Vidal, with bag, and Canuto Garcia, right, shortly after the two men illegally crossed the border from Mexico, west of Calexico, Calif. Mexican laborers try to cross in this area to the United States, to work on the farms of the nearby Imperial Valley. (AP Photo/File)
In this Aug. 11, 1951 file photo, U.S. Border Patrol inspectors Fred H. Voight, left, and Gordon MacDonald, right, both from the El Centro U.S. Border Patrol sector headquarters, search two Mexican nationals, Pedro Vidal, with bag, and Canuto Garcia, right, shortly after the two men illegally crossed the border from Mexico, west of Calexico, Calif. Mexican laborers try to cross in this area to the United States, to work on the farms of the nearby Imperial Valley. (AP Photo/File)
In this Aug. 14, 1945 file photo, Chinese-Americans on Mott and Pell Streets in New York's Chinatown celebrate the Japanese surrender on V-J Day. In 1868, the U.S. signed a treaty encouraging Chinese migration; 24 years later, the Chinese Exclusion Act turned away immigrants from what was even then the world’s most populous nation. (AP Photo/Tom Fitzsimmons, File)
In this Aug. 14, 1945 file photo, Chinese-Americans on Mott and Pell Streets in New York's Chinatown celebrate the Japanese surrender on V-J Day. In 1868, the U.S. signed a treaty encouraging Chinese migration; 24 years later, the Chinese Exclusion Act turned away immigrants from what was even then the world’s most populous nation. (AP Photo/Tom Fitzsimmons, File)
This Tuesday, April 22, 2008 file photo shows a dorm area in the T. Don Hutto Residential Center in Taylor, Texas, during a tour for the media. Immigrant advocates sued U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement on behalf of children in the facility and reached a settlement that called for improved conditions, including privacy curtains around toilets, a full-time pediatrician and elimination of a counting system that required families to be in their cells most of the day. (AP Photo/Donna McWilliam, Pool)
This Tuesday, April 22, 2008 file photo shows a dorm area in the T. Don Hutto Residential Center in Taylor, Texas, during a tour for the media. Immigrant advocates sued U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement on behalf of children in the facility and reached a settlement that called for improved conditions, including privacy curtains around toilets, a full-time pediatrician and elimination of a counting system that required families to be in their cells most of the day. (AP Photo/Donna McWilliam, Pool)
In this Saturday, Jan. 11, 2014 file photo, the Statue of Liberty is surrounded by fog on Liberty Island in New York. The American self-image is forever intertwined with the melting pot _ a nation that embraces the world’s wretched refuse, a nation built by immigrants. But America’s immigration history is complicated. (AP Photo/Santiago Lyon)
In this Saturday, Jan. 11, 2014 file photo, the Statue of Liberty is surrounded by fog on Liberty Island in New York. The American self-image is forever intertwined with the melting pot _ a nation that embraces the world’s wretched refuse, a nation built by immigrants. But America’s immigration history is complicated. (AP Photo/Santiago Lyon)
In this Friday, Sept. 30, 2016 file photo, people wave U.S. flags after they became citizens during a naturalization ceremony in Miami. The United States is far less inviting than it once was: The number of immigrants obtaining legal permanent resident status in 2010 was just over a million _ almost precisely the same number as it was a hundred years earlier, when the population was less than a third of what it is in 2017. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)
In this Friday, Sept. 30, 2016 file photo, people wave U.S. flags after they became citizens during a naturalization ceremony in Miami. The United States is far less inviting than it once was: The number of immigrants obtaining legal permanent resident status in 2010 was just over a million _ almost precisely the same number as it was a hundred years earlier, when the population was less than a third of what it is in 2017. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)
Alejandro Fierro, right, and three other Mexican farm workers sit under a poster of the Statue of Liberty at the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service office in Denver, Colo., Nov. 11, 1987. Fierro and the others were waiting to begin the application process for amnesty under the landmark Immigration Control and Reform Act of 1986. From left are: Jose Duenas-Lopez; Jose Santillano; Carlo Castro-Gutierres and Fierro. (AP Photo)
Alejandro Fierro, right, and three other Mexican farm workers sit under a poster of the Statue of Liberty at the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service office in Denver, Colo., Nov. 11, 1987. Fierro and the others were waiting to begin the application process for amnesty under the landmark Immigration Control and Reform Act of 1986. From left are: Jose Duenas-Lopez; Jose Santillano; Carlo Castro-Gutierres and Fierro. (AP Photo)
IIn this April 7, 1949 file photo, immigrants look at the view from Ellis Island in New York Harbor. The Manhattan skyline is behind them. The American self-image is forever intertwined with the melting pot _ a nation that embraces the world’s wretched refuse, a nation built by immigrants. But America’s immigration history is complicated. (AP Photo/Fitzsimmons, File)
IIn this April 7, 1949 file photo, immigrants look at the view from Ellis Island in New York Harbor. The Manhattan skyline is behind them. The American self-image is forever intertwined with the melting pot _ a nation that embraces the world’s wretched refuse, a nation built by immigrants. But America’s immigration history is complicated. (AP Photo/Fitzsimmons, File)
In this April 12, 1939 file photo, 126 new citizens of the United States are sworn in at the U.S. District Court in Philadelphia. The United States is far less inviting than it once was: The number of immigrants obtaining legal permanent resident status in 2010 was just over a million _ almost precisely the same number as it was a hundred years earlier, when the population was less than a third of what it is in 2017. (AP Photo/File)
In this April 12, 1939 file photo, 126 new citizens of the United States are sworn in at the U.S. District Court in Philadelphia. The United States is far less inviting than it once was: The number of immigrants obtaining legal permanent resident status in 2010 was just over a million _ almost precisely the same number as it was a hundred years earlier, when the population was less than a third of what it is in 2017. (AP Photo/File)
In this Wednesday, Dec. 7, 2016 file photo, a U.S. Customs and Border Protection agent stands in a temporary holding facility near the Donna-Rio Bravo International Bridge in Donna, Texas. The tent facility, primarily to be used as a temporary holding site for children and family units who have entered the county illegally, is expected process up to 500 people a day. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
In this Wednesday, Dec. 7, 2016 file photo, a U.S. Customs and Border Protection agent stands in a temporary holding facility near the Donna-Rio Bravo International Bridge in Donna, Texas. The tent facility, primarily to be used as a temporary holding site for children and family units who have entered the county illegally, is expected process up to 500 people a day. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
In this Aug. 4, 1944 file photo, civilian refugees from occupied Europe arrive at Hoboken, N.J., during World War II. The refugees, who will be given sanctuary for the duration of the war, will go to Fort Ontario, Oswego, N.Y., where an emergency relief shelter was established. Jewish refugees from Europe were blocked during and after World War II _ first because of fears that they might be German sympathizers, then because of fears that they were Communists. (AP Photo/File)
In this Aug. 4, 1944 file photo, civilian refugees from occupied Europe arrive at Hoboken, N.J., during World War II. The refugees, who will be given sanctuary for the duration of the war, will go to Fort Ontario, Oswego, N.Y., where an emergency relief shelter was established. Jewish refugees from Europe were blocked during and after World War II _ first because of fears that they might be German sympathizers, then because of fears that they were Communists. (AP Photo/File)
In this Nov. 21, 1951 file photo, Bill Vetesy of Colonia, N.J., holds a picture of his mother and brother as he asks a military police officer inside the fence at Camp Kilmer, N.J., if they are among the 60 Hungarian refugees who arrived at the camp. The first plane load of refugees arrived at nearby McGuire Air Force Base from Vienna earlier in the day. The refugees will be housed at Camp Kilmer until quarters in private homes are made available to them in the United States. (AP Photo/Anthoy Camerano, File)
In this Nov. 21, 1951 file photo, Bill Vetesy of Colonia, N.J., holds a picture of his mother and brother as he asks a military police officer inside the fence at Camp Kilmer, N.J., if they are among the 60 Hungarian refugees who arrived at the camp. The first plane load of refugees arrived at nearby McGuire Air Force Base from Vienna earlier in the day. The refugees will be housed at Camp Kilmer until quarters in private homes are made available to them in the United States. (AP Photo/Anthoy Camerano, File)
U.S. Border Patrol officer Ed Pyeatt
ASSOCIATED PRESS
U.S. Border Patrol officer Ed Pyeatt
This is an undated photo of a group of immigrants arriving at Ellis Island in New York. They are waiting in line to begin immigration proceedings. (AP Photo)
This is an undated photo of a group of immigrants arriving at Ellis Island in New York. They are waiting in line to begin immigration proceedings. (AP Photo)
An inmate at the Krome North Service Processing Center is served lunch by a prison employee
ASSOCIATED PRESS
An inmate at the Krome North Service Processing Center is served lunch by a prison employee
The main registry building on Ellis Island is shown in this 1905  photo. The Supreme Court ruled Tuesday
ASSOCIATED PRESS
The main registry building on Ellis Island is shown in this 1905 photo. The Supreme Court ruled Tuesday
A happy group of Hungarian youngsters needs no prompting to smile for the photographer for this pose aboard the Navy transport Gen. Walker which brought nearly 2
A happy group of Hungarian youngsters needs no prompting to smile for the photographer for this pose aboard the Navy transport Gen. Walker which brought nearly 2
A group of 208 White Russian Old Believers
ASSOCIATED PRESS
A group of 208 White Russian Old Believers
Steps in getting placed in jobs are outlined to Sodman Dalantinow, one of the Kalmuks, of Mongolian origin, coming to this area to live, by State Employment counselor Ruth Griffin, left, while Dalantinow’s wife and two small daughters, Baska, 6, and Zema, 8, listen in Philadelphia on Feb. 5, 1952. Dalantinew is one of 600 Kalmuks, first ever to be brought to the United States. They are coming here from displaced persons camps in Germany as the United States is the only country which would permit their immigration. (AP Photo/WMW)
Steps in getting placed in jobs are outlined to Sodman Dalantinow, one of the Kalmuks, of Mongolian origin, coming to this area to live, by State Employment counselor Ruth Griffin, left, while Dalantinow’s wife and two small daughters, Baska, 6, and Zema, 8, listen in Philadelphia on Feb. 5, 1952. Dalantinew is one of 600 Kalmuks, first ever to be brought to the United States. They are coming here from displaced persons camps in Germany as the United States is the only country which would permit their immigration. (AP Photo/WMW)

A look at immigration in America via the Associated Press photo archives.

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