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Friday - April 19, 2013

| Saturday, April 20, 2013, 12:01 a.m.
It's as if this little dog statue at a home in Economy has nothing to worry about Friday, April 19, 2013.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Andrew Sabak of Fairmount West Virginia struggles with an umbrella outside the Cathedral of Learning in Oakland. Sabak was in town to see hi daughter, a Pitt student, receive an acedemic award.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Thomas Granger, a sophomore at the University of Pittsburgh embrace during the start of an event at the University of Pittsburgh that brought together members of the Pitt community to walk five laps around The Cathedral of Learning to pay their respect to those affected by the tragedy at the Boston Marathom, Friday.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Tori Harms, a Ph.D candidate at the University of Pittsburgh writes words of encouragement to the city of Boston during an event at the University of Pittsburgh that brought together members of the Pitt community to walk five laps around The Cathedral of Learning to pay their respect to those affected by the tragedy at the Boston Marathon, Friday.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Students from the University of Pittsburgh link arms on the steps of the Cathedral of Learning during an event that brought together members of the Pitt community to walk five laps around The Cathedral of Learning to pay their respect to those affected by the tragedy at the Boston Marathom, Friday.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Taylor Abbonizio, a freshman (left) and Hannah Fitzpatrick, a sophomore at the University of Pittsburgh embrace during the start of an event at the University of Pittsburgh that brought together members of the Pitt community to walk five laps around The Cathedral of Learning to pay their respect to those affected by the tragedy at the Boston Marathom, Friday.
Jasmine Goldband | Tribune-Review
Pittsburgh police reroute traffic around the West End Bridge after shutting the bridge down due to a suspicious package.
Stephanie Strasburg | Tribune-Review
Carnegie Mellon University researcher Chris Bettinger, 32, of Shadyside, poses on Thursday, April 18, 2013 for a portrait with the edible battery he designed at Carnegie Mellon University in Oakland. Using materials that can be ingested and then turned on as a power source, he and his team have developed the equivalent of a tiny battery that clinicians could use for a variety of medical purposes. Folks at Innovation Works are already invested, saying the battery could be part of the nation’s medical arsenal within the next four years.

Daily images from around the region by Trib Total Media staff photographers.

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