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Thursday - July 18, 2013

| Friday, July 19, 2013, 12:01 a.m.
Sidney Davis | Tribune-Review
Andrew Fudoush, age 13, tussles with his younger brother, Nathan, age 8, in a inflatable pool on the bed of their father's truck in Sharspburg on Thursday July 18, 2013. The parents are planning to attend tonight's Jimmy Buffet concert with the pool to cool off in while in the vene's parking lot.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Lauren Hartman, a senior majoring in communication design at Carnegie Mellon University studies in the window of Margaret Morrison Hall on CMU Campus, Thursday.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Recep Onler of Squirrel Hill and student at Carnegie Mellon University checks his phone in the shade on Flagstaff Hill, Thursday.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Chanel Curges, 14 of Chartiers City and Allison Williams, 13 of Brookline (left) test a windmill they built as part of the Summer Engineering Experience, an annual free summer camp for girls sponsored by Carnegie Mellon University’s Institute for complex engineered systems at Baker Porter Hall, Thursday.
James Knox
'it's going to be a hot one,' says a man calling himself Cricket as he sets up a farm stand for the McIlhenny's Evans City farm Thursday July 18, 2013 along Babcock Boulevard in Shaler.
Gwen Titley | Tribune-Review
Cokie Reed (left) and Sam Blum (right), 'hot doggers' for Oscar Meyer, talk to park goers about the wiener mobile on July 18, 2013 in Schenley Park. Reed and Blum are participating in a cross country competition with the other six wiener mobiles.
Gwen Titley | Tribune-Review
Sam Blum, a 'hot dogger' for Oscar Meyer, shows Richard Wang, 5, how to use a whistle inside of the wiener mobile on July 18, 2013 in Schenley Park. Richard was in the park with his father, Jianjun.
Keith Hodan | Tribune-Review
Tylis Mittenzwey, 2, of Elliott, catches a nap while draped across his father, Thomas' , shoulders, as they walk through Market Square, Downtown, Thursday, July 19, 2013.
Heidi Murrin | Tribune-Review
From left, Elizabeth Daffern, 14 of Mt. Oliver, Gabriel Downing, 15, Sam Johnson V, and Chelsey Downing, 16, cool off in the Johnson/Downing pool on the South Side Slopes Thursday, July 18, 2013.
Brian F. Henry | Tribune-Review
Jimmy Hauser (left) and Dan Holnaider of Bruno A. Holnaider II Construction in Latrobe put shingles on a garage roof near Kecksburg on Thursday, July 18, 2013. The crew said they recorded roof temperatures over 140 degrees this week.
Keith Hodan | Tribune-Review
Yvonne Brown, of the Hill District, becomes emotional as she expresses her opinion on a proposed residency requirement for the City of Pittsburgh employees, including the police. Brown and others voiced their concerns during a public hearing at City Council, Downtown, Thursday, July 18, 2013.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Shannen Cloherty 14, of Murraysville, Kayla Ruslavage 14, of Canonsburg, Natalie Cummings 15, of Canonsburg and Kripa George, 14 of Canonsburg test a windmill they built as part of the Summer Engineering Experience, an annual free summer camp for girls sponsored by Carnegie Mellon University’s Institute for complex engineered systems at Baker Porter Hall, Thursday.
Sean Stipp | Tribune-Review
Tyler Condrasky, 14, of North Huntingdon and fellow campers salute the American flag as it is raised Thursday morning, July 18, 2013 at Pitcairn Camp B at Laurel Hill State Park in Somerset County. Camp “B” began shortly after World War II as a way for returning veterans to reconnect with their children while helping to rebuild the communities they left behind. Today, the site allows boys ages 7 to 16 to experience camping in the mountains.

Daily images from around the region by Trib Total Media staff photographers.

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