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Monday - November 11, 2013

| Monday, Nov. 11, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Revie
Tucker Winner, 15 and football player for Sharon High School, holds a football owned by senior football player, Corey Swartz, 18 who was killed on Friday night in a car accident with fellow senior football player, Evan Gill, 17 on Connelly Boulevard, just west of the Oakland Avenue viaduct in Sharon, before the Tigers playoff game against Girard in Erie, Monday. Swartz and Gill's jersey were draped over their players lockers at the locker room at Tigers Stadium.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Dylan Veccio, 15 and football player for Sharon High School, straightens the jersey of senior football player, Corey Swartz, 18 who was killed on Friday night in a car accident with fellow senior football player, Evan Gill, 17 on Connelly Boulevard, just west of the Oakland Avenue viaduct in Sharon, before the Tigers playoff game against Girard in Erie, Monday. Swartz and Gill's jersey were draped over their players lockers at the locker room at Tigers Stadium.
James Knox | Pittsburgh Tribune-Review
World War II veteran Alfred Armendariz , 93 salutes his fellow vets at the start of the 15th Annual Veterans Day Breakfast on Monday, Nov. 11, 2013 in the Union Ballroom at Duquesne University. More than 700 veterans will be honored at the event hosted by Duquesne and presented by the Veterans Leadership Program of Western Pennsylvania, along with Highmark Blue Cross Blue Shield. It is the largest Veterans Day Breakfast held in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.
James Knox | Pittsburgh Tribune-Review
The color guard climbs the stairs to get into position before the start of the 15th Annual Veterans Day Breakfast on Monday, Nov. 11, 2013 in the Union Ballroom at Duquesne University. More than 700 veterans will be honored at the event hosted by Duquesne and presented by the Veterans Leadership Program of Western Pennsylvania, along with Highmark Blue Cross Blue Shield. It is the largest Veterans Day Breakfast held in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.
Evan R. Sanders | Daily Courier
Bill Brang, a World War II veteran who served with the Army Air Force in the South Pacific, walks in the Fayette County Veterans Day Parade along West Main Street in Uniontown on Monday, Nov. 11, 2013.
Jason Bridge | Valley News Dis
Vandergrift Veterans Honor Guard member Robert King, an Air Force veteran in the Korean War, plays the bugle during the Kiski Valley Veterans and Patriots Association Veterans Day ceremony at the Allegheny Township War Memorial on Monday, November 11, 2013.
Eric Felack | Valley News Dispatch
With the Valley High School JROTC color guard, from left, Joe Lewis, Nick Szanto, Nicole Gray, and Myah Zana, passing in the background, Chante White of Arnold looks behind her towards her father, a U.S. Marine, for approval on her salute during the New Kensington-Arnold Veterans Day parade on Monday, Nov. 11, 2013.
Jasmine Goldband | Tribune-Review
World War II army veteran Frank Evangelist, 84 of Emsworth watches the Veteran's Day parade with his grandson Nicolas Evangelist, 8 in downtown Pittsburgh.
Jasmine Goldband | Tribune-Review
West View elementary school students watch the Veteran's Day parade, Downtown.
Sean Stipp | Tribune-Review
David D. D’Amico, an employee of Carpenter–Latrobe Specialty Metals, grabs boxes of cereal during a three-minute grocery shopping spree at the Charley Family Route 66 Shop ‘n Save in Greensburg, to benefit the Westmoreland County Food Bank. D’Amico won the United Way of Westmoreland County’s first “step up” prize drawing of 2013.
Eric Felack | Valley News Dispatch
Fairmount Primary Center kindergarten students Avrianna West (front left) and Eli Rodgers learn keyboarding skills in technology instructor Andrew Lynch's class at the Harrison school on Wednesday, Nov. 6, 2013.

Daily images from around the region by Trib Total Media staff photographers.

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