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Monday - Aug. 18, 2014

| Monday, Aug. 18, 2014, 4:51 p.m.
Jasmine Goldband | Trib Total Media
Pennsylvania State troopers work the scene of an accident involving state police and a stolen vehicle that shut down an inbound lane of Interstate-376 West Monday, Aug. 18, 2014.
James Knox | Trib Total Media
Mentors Sarah Kordish (from left), Gita Venkat and Andrew Colaizzi, from the Office of First Year Experience, hang a 'Class of 2018' inflated sign around the pillars of the William Pitt Union on Monday Aug. 18, 2014. It was the first day students can move into dorms on the Oakland campus of the University of Pittsburgh. Bigelow Boulevard will be closed through Thursday to accomadate the crush of students and their families.
James Knox | Trib Total Media
Students, parents and volunteers shuffle belongings up a ramp Monday Aug. 18, 2014, in front of the William Pitt Union on the first day students can move into dorms on the Oakland campus of the University of Pittsburgh. Bigelow Boulevard will be closed through Thursday to accomadate the crush of students and their families.
Stephanie Strasburg | Trib Total Media
Dane Linver, 9, winds up to pass a football to his best friend Jordan Ritchie, 14, as they play on the street in their neighborhood of Millvale on Monday, Aug. 18, 2014.
Erica Dietz | Trib Total Media
Julio Bartolomeo of Buffalo Township clips a bouquet of zinnias in his garden on Monday, Aug. 18, 2014.
Jasmine Goldband | Trib Total Media
Pittsburgh Public Works employees Tim Bagshaw, 52, of Lincoln Place (left) and Cory Barnes, 23, of Sheridan shroud the City-County Building in bunting in memory of former Pittsburgh Mayor Sophie Masloff on Monday, Aug. 18, 2014. A public funeral service for the former Mayor is scheduled for 11 a.m. Tuesday in Temple Sinai, Squirrel Hill.
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