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Art in the Kitchen Tasting Tour visits museum, theater

| Sunday, Oct. 7, 2012, 8:57 p.m.
Gail Fleckenstein, (R), of Elizabeth Township, watches Chef Sergio Maragni prepare shrimp aioli and battered artichokes, while giving a cooking demonstration at the Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg on Saturday morning, October 6, 2012, to guests attending the 15th annual Art in the Kitchen Tasting Tour, hosted by the Women's Committee of the Westmoreland Museum of American Art. Kim Stepinsky | For The Tribune-Review

The Women's Committee of Westmoreland Museum of American Art on Saturday coordinated the 15th annualArt in the Kitchen Tasting Tour.

Cultural locations were the Greensburg museum and Apple Hill Playhouse near Delmont.

Guests got a behind-the-scenes tour of Apple Hill, a pre-Civil War era barn-turned-playhouse bought in 1981 by Pat Beyer, the theater's executive producer. Known as the William Penn Playhouse in the 1950s, Apple Hill offers dramas to comedies May through September.

Vintage props, such as a General Electric refrigerating machine, were used in Apple Hill's stage “kitchen.” Volunteer Adrienne Fischer shared Apple Hill lore, such as the tale of Southern sympathizers who hid the body of a Confederate soldier behind the stone walls in the basement.

At the museum, Sergio Maragni, an instructor at Westmoreland County Community College and operator of Sergio's Menu, which offers catering and cooking lessons, used pinches and dashes of staple ingredients to create battered artichokes and Shrimp Aioli in mere minutes.

Residential hosts were Paul and Linda Bieterman of Greensburg, Ken and Sue White of Unity Township, John and Jackie Frank of Penn Township and Ty and Judy Radcliff of Murrysville, who opened their amazing kitchens for the tour and offered samples of recipes prepared from the Art in the Kitchen cookbook.

Event chairwoman was Marie Gallatin.

Seen: Museum director and CEO Judith O'Toole, Shirleah Kelly, Sally Loughran, Sue Kiren, Susan Tanto, Barbara Ferrier, Susan Ciarimboli, Roxanne Fontanesi, Kathy Hollahan, Lois Kemp, Suzanne Mahady, Susan Piccolo and Sally Rager.

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