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Positively Posh shopping event features crafted items

| Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012, 9:03 p.m.
Dr. Francis DeFabo creates pottery -- everything from bowls to mugs to cake plates to footed centerpiece bowls. Mike DeFabo
Mike DeFabo
Dr. Francis DeFabo creates pottery -- everything from bowls to mugs to cake plates to footed centerpiece bowls. Mike DeFabo
Dr. Francis DeFabo creates pottery -- everything from bowls to mugs to cake plates to footed centerpiece bowls. Mike DeFabo
Dr. Francis DeFabo creates pottery -- everything from bowls to mugs to cake plates to footed centerpiece bowls. Mike DeFabo
Dr. Francis DeFabo creates pottery -- everything from bowls to mugs to cake plates to footed centerpiece bowls. Mike DeFabo
Billie and John Humberger
Billie and John Humberger create necklaces, bracelets and pendants from sterling silver, gold filled and copper wire. They craft the lamp work beads themselves. Billie and John Humberger
Billie and John Humberger
Billie and John Humberger create necklaces, bracelets and pendants from sterling silver, gold filled and copper wire. They craft the lamp work beads themselves. Billie and John Humberger
Billie and John Humberger
Billie and John Humberger create necklaces, bracelets and pendants from sterling silver, gold filled and copper wire. They craft the lamp work beads themselves. Billie and John Humberger
Billie and John Humberger
Billie and John Humberger create necklaces, bracelets and pendants from sterling silver, gold filled and copper wire. They craft the lamp work beads themselves. Billie and John Humberger
Olive oil gift set
Beverly Wolbert
Beverly Wolbert of Greentree owns The Pearl Peddler whichsells beautiful scaves, shawls and furs. Beverly Wolbert
Beverly Wolbert
Beverly Wolbert of Greentree owns The Pearl Peddler which specializes in cultured pearls and semi-precious gemstone jewlery. Beverly Wolbert
Beverly Wolbert
Beverly Wolbert of Greentree owns The Pearl Peddler which specializes in cultured pearls and semi-precious gemstone jewlery. Beverly Wolbert
Beverly Wolbert
Beverly Wolbert of Greentree owns The Pearl Peddler which sells beautiful scaves, shawls and furs. Beverly Wolbert
Beverly Wolbert
Beverly Wolbert of Greentree owns The Pearl Peddler which specializes in cultured pearls and semi-precious gemstone jewlery. Beverly Wolbert
Beverly Wolbert
Beverly Wolbert of Greentree owns The Pearl Peddler which specializes in cultured pearls and semi-precious gemstone jewlery. Beverly Wolbert
Beverly Wolbert
Beverly Wolbert of Greentree owns The Pearl Peddler which specializes in cultured pearls and semi-precious gemstone jewlery. Beverly Wolbert
Tim Roth
Tim Roth of Tim Roth of Pottery and Cane creates pottery with a cane bottom. Tim Roth
Tim Roth
Tim Roth of Tim Roth of Pottery and Cane creates pottery with a cane bottom. Tim Roth

After a long day treating patients, Dr. Francis DeFabo has found a perfect way to relax.

He fires up the oven, but not to cook.

DeFabo creates pottery as a hobby. His works will be showcased at the third-annual Positively Posh shopping event on Saturday being sponsored by the Latrobe Area Hospital Aid Society. He is one of 40 participating vendors.

This year, all proceeds will benefit patients and their families in the critical-care unit of Excela Health Latrobe Hospital.

“We all have a creative side somewhere,” says DeFaboof Latrobe. “Some of us are able to be creative on a daily basis with our daily jobs, while others, like me, have to be creative outside the job.”

DeFabo forms mugs and small items such as bowls, cake plates and footed centerpiece bowls. He carves designs into each piece.

“It is a fun hobby, but it certainly is not a neat hobby,” he says. “Luckily, my wife has been very understanding about how messy this hobby is.”

A fellow potter is Tim Roth from Greensburg, who will make his first appearance as a vendor. He creates pottery with cane seats woven into the bottom.

“They are unique,” Roth says. “It takes a lot of patience to make them. They are all done by hand. They are both decorative and functional trays and bowls.”

Positively Posh planners strive to bring a variety of vendors such as potters, clothing designers, gourmet food items, housewares and jewelry. They try to keep prices reasonable, says Elizabeth Naidu, chair of the event.

“We want to appeal to as many people as possible,” Naidu says. “We strive to offer unique items you won't find at a local mall or boutique shop in town.”

Beverly Wolbert of Greentree, who owns The Pearl Peddler, is returning for a second year. She creates jewelry and textiles. As a purser for Delta airlines, she travels internationally, where she finds interesting materials.

“Working for Delta is my No. 1 job, but I also enjoy the jewelry and textiles, which are a passion of mine,” Wolbert says. “I really enjoyed being part of Positively Posh last year. They are so organized, and there are great volunteers who make sure you have everything you need. The attendance is really good, and everyone I have met was friendly. ... I also enjoy helping a good cause.”

So do Billie and John Humbergerfrom Ligonier, who have been selling their jewelry every year at Positively Posh.

“The organization and the vendors are all top-notch,” Billie Humberger says. “A lot of people like to give presents that are handmade and they even ask us for a card showing it is handmade.”

For those with culinary interests, Hersh Petrocelly's first-time booth will beckon. The Shaler resident sells products from The Olive Tap Company, which specializes in artisan olive oils and vinegars.

“I am excited about being part of this event,” Petrocelly says. “This is the time of year people are looking for unique items and our product is unique, down to the packaging.”

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at jharrop@tribweb.com or 412-320-7889.

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