TribLIVE

| News


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Coping with Kids: Zip-top ice pops, kids entering puberty

About The Tribune-Review
The Tribune-Review can be reached via e-mail or at 412-321-6460.
Contact Us | Video | Photo Reprints

Daily Photo Galleries


By The Tribune-Review

Published: Monday, Jan. 14, 2013, 9:17 p.m.

Create favorite ice pop flavors in zip-top molds

Zipzicles make it easy to create healthy popsicles at home to soothe irritated throats. Kid-invented Zipzicles are zip-top ice-pop molds that you can fill with your favorite flavors. Great for kids with allergies and special food requirements. Just zip closed and freeze. Too busy to finish? Zipzicles easily zips closed to save for later. Healthy and fun recipes are available, including root-beer creamzicle, strawberry lemonade, tangy blueberry and even pumpkin pie.

The containers provide a fun way for kids to experiment with healthy flavors and create a unique flavor without sticks or a drippy mess. They are BPA free and recyclable. They sell for $2.99 for 12 bags at www.zipzicles.com.

Forbes hospital offers classes about puberty

Is your child entering those difficult adolescent years? Forbes Regional Hospital in Monroeville is offering a class designed to help parents with children facing puberty, starting with the tween age.

The two-hour class, called “What's Happening to Me?”, talks about the physical, emotional and social changes that happen between ages 9 and 13. Participants will receive information about anatomy, reproduction, communication skills and a healthy lifestyle. Classes for girls will be March 1, May 31, Sept. 13 and Dec. 6. Classes for boys will be March 19 and Oct. 1. Classes begin at 7 p.m., and the cost is $15 per child, with $10 for each additional child in the family. Registration is required.

Details: 412-362-8677

Winter-driving tips keep kids safe

Winter driving has its hazards, especially with young children. Consider these safety tips from Julie Kleinert, North American Child Safety Technical Lead for General Motors, and Kate Carr, president and chief executive officer of Safe Kids Worldwide.

• Avoid bulky winter clothes; thick coats can compromise the effectiveness of a car seat by creating a loose seat harness.

• Place a blanket or the removed coat over the car seat to keep the child warm and snug.

• Check your tailpipe before driving. If it's blocked with snow, you could get carbon monoxide poisoning.

• Prepare for Mother Nature with an emergency bag, in case you get stuck in the cold and snow. Include water, baby food or formula, diapers, extra blankets and a spare set of warm clothing.

• Be on the lookout for sleds, especially in residential neighborhoods.

• Buckle up on all trips.

Doctor advises keeping medical-record book

Most parents keep a memory book for their child to keep track of milestones, but consider keeping a medical-record book for your children.

According to Dr. Cary Presant, keeping an at-home medical record is one of the most-important things a parent can do to keep their child healthy.

“You may need the information when you travel with your child in case of emergency. If your child needs a specialist consultation, you have all the records you need to be sure the specialist doesn't miss anything important,” Presant says.

He offers advice for keeping proper medical records at home in his new book, “Surviving American Medicine: How to Get the Right Doctor, Right Hospital and Right Treatment with Today's Health Care.”

The book is published by iUniverse and is available at iuniverse.com, Amazon and Barnes & Noble. The paperback version is $17.95, hardcover is $41.95 and the ebook is $9.99.

‘Who's on First' captures comedy routine

The classic routine of “Who's on First” by iconic comedians William “Bud” Abbott and Lou Costello takes on new life as a picture book from Quirk Books, aimed at ages 7 and older. The book “Who's on First” goes on sale in late February for $16.95.

— Staff and wire reports

Send parenting news to Coping With Kids in care of Rebecca Killian, Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, D.L. Clark Building, 503 Martindale St., Pittsburgh, PA 15212; fax 412-320-7966; or email rkillian@tribweb.com.

 

 
 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read News

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.