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Fanfare: Bricolage Urban Scrawl gala: Artists get 24-hours to create plays for audience

| Monday, March 13, 2017, 10:45 a.m.
John Altdorfer
TaeAjah Cannon, Bricolage’s BUS August Wilson Center, Downtown Pittsburgh. March 11, 2017.
John Altdorfer
Leah Patanski, Bricolage’s BUS August Wilson Center, Downtown Pittsburgh. March 11, 2017.
John Altdorfer
Producing artstic director Tami Dixon, Bricolage’s BUS August Wilson Center, Downtown Pittsburgh. March 11, 2017.
John Altdorfer
Leah Segal and Christopher Frydryck, Bricolage’s BUS August Wilson Center, Downtown Pittsburgh. March 11, 2017.
John Altdorfer
Mike Goessler, Bricolage’s BUS August Wilson Center, Downtown Pittsburgh. March 11, 2017.
John Altdorfer
Richard Parsakian and Ang Vesco, Bricolage’s BUS August Wilson Center, Downtown Pittsburgh. March 11, 2017.
John Altdorfer
Teisha Duncan and Shakara Wright, Bricolage’s BUS August Wilson Center, Downtown Pittsburgh. March 11, 2017.
John Altdorfer
Margie and Alan Baum, Bricolage’s BUS August Wilson Center, Downtown Pittsburgh. March 11, 2017.
John Altdorfer
Krista Best and Katy Stewart, Bricolage’s BUS August Wilson Center, Downtown Pittsburgh. March 11, 2017.

“Yesterday, we had nothing. We had incredible people, but no stories,” said Bricolage producing artistic director Tami Dixon. “I started reading the plays at 7:30 this morning when the scripts came in. No pressure!”

Operating purely on instinct and perhaps a shot or two of sadistic pleasure, 40 of the city's top artists came together in whirlwind fashion to produce six, 10-minute long plays in 24-hours that would premiere in front of a live, 350-member audience during the annual BUS (Bricolage Urban Scrawl) Gala on March 11.

“As one of the directors, I have the easiest job. We're basically therapists for the day, making sure actors aren't freaking out during the day because of too many lines,” said Brad Stephenson, which explained the reasoning for the backstage massage room.

“Plus, the time I was acting I was in my underwear so directing is way less pressure,” he added.

Well before curtain call at the August Wilson Center, a leisurely mix and mingle unfolded in the usual way until Mike Goessler floated by in his green velvet leprechaun suit, which was rumored to be worn on a dare. “Hey, if you got it, flaunt it,” he said.

But for the most part, the hot topic of conversation revolved around the obvious.

“This brings all the creative forces of Pittsburgh together,” said Richard Parsakian. “The arts are a big factor in what makes Pittsburgh great.”

On the list was Bricolage artistic director Jeffrey Carpenter; playwrights Gab Cody, Kim El, Gayle Pazerski, Dave Harris, Sloan MacRae, Mark Clayton Southers; directors Hallie Donnor, Linda Haston, Ricardo Vila-Roger, Sam Turich, and actors that included Elena Alexandratos, Julianne Avolio, Chrystal Bates, Jonathan Berrym TaeAjah Cannon, Parag S. Gohel, Lisa Ann Goldsmith, Brett Goodnack, Wali Jamal, Billy Jenkins, Christopher Josephs, Amy Landis, Gregory Lehane, Connor McCanlus, Jason McCune, Missy Moreno, Delilah Picart, Sundiata Rice, Quinn Patrick Shannon, Christine Starkey, Genna Styles, Kelly Trumbull, Michael Angelo Turner, Shakara Wright.

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