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Fanfare: Pittsburgh Festival Opera's Gala Cubana toasts first new Cuban opera in 50 years

| Monday, April 24, 2017, 9:33 a.m.
John Altdorfer
Gail Mosites, Gala Cubana - Pittsburgh Festival Opera, Pittsburgh Golf Club, Schenley Park. April 22, 2017.
John Altdorfer
Josy Nkuissi, Gala Cubana - Pittsburgh Festival Opera, Pittsburgh Golf Club, Schenley Park. April 22, 2017.
John Altdorfer
John Yaple, Gala Cubana - Pittsburgh Festival Opera, Pittsburgh Golf Club, Schenley Park. April 22, 2017.
John Altdorfer
Gene Bokor, Bud Smith, event chair Caroline Smith and Georgia Bokor, Gala Cubana - Pittsburgh Festival Opera, Pittsburgh Golf Club, Schenley Park. April 22, 2017.
John Altdorfer
Pamela Haro, Gala Cubana - Pittsburgh Festival Opera, Pittsburgh Golf Club, Schenley Park. April 22, 2017.
John Altdorfer
Jamie Pasquinelli, Gala Cubana - Pittsburgh Festival Opera, Pittsburgh Golf Club, Schenley Park. April 22, 2017.
John Altdorfer
Mark Custer, Gala Cubana - Pittsburgh Festival Opera, Pittsburgh Golf Club, Schenley Park. April 22, 2017.
John Altdorfer
Dan, Michael and Carole Kamin, Gala Cubana - Pittsburgh Festival Opera, Pittsburgh Golf Club, Schenley Park. April 22, 2017.
John Altdorfer
Dr. Helene Finegold, Gala Cubana - Pittsburgh Festival Opera, Pittsburgh Golf Club, Schenley Park. April 22, 2017.
John Altdorfer
Miguel Sague, Gala Cubana - Pittsburgh Festival Opera, Pittsburgh Golf Club, Schenley Park. April 22, 2017.
John Altdorfer
Pamela Haro and Mustfa Ozkan, Gala Cubana - Pittsburgh Festival Opera, Pittsburgh Golf Club, Schenley Park. April 22, 2017.
John Altdorfer
The grille of a 1956 Buick Special, Gala Cubana - Pittsburgh Festival Opera, Pittsburgh Golf Club, Schenley Park. April 22, 2017.

Who knew that the gents would be the ones who upped the fashion ante during the Pittsburgh Festival Opera's Gala Cubana?

“This was another of those things just waiting for the event,” said Michael Kamin of his floral button down and matching kicks, which just happened to be hanging in his closet.

Having had in large part answered the call to dress the part, 150 guests arrived at the Pittsburgh Golf Club in Squirrel Hill on April 22 decked out in a rainbow of vibrant colors. Amongst them was Paul Gitnik, who maintained his tradition of turning heads with a sports coat popping with personality. Not to mention, a bronzed glow courtesy of time spent in Florida.

“That's not a tan… that's blood pressure!” joked Gene Svrcek.

As cocktail hour progressed, the steel drums proved too irresistible for Georgia and Gene Bokor, who carved out their own dance floor while models floated by wearing the vivacious fashions from designer Lana Neumeyer.

But it was the conga line led by dancer Teanna Medina that signaled the real start of the party.

On the list were Pittsburgh Festival Opera founder Mildred Miller Posvar and her daughter, Marina Posvar, party chairwoman Carolyn Smith and her husband, Bud, PFO chairman Dr. Jerry Clack, president Dr. Eugene Myers, Joyce Candi Grove, committee members Evelyn Castillo, Joseph Bielecki, Dr. Margaretha Casselbrant, Carole Kamin, Gail Novak Mosites.

The evening toasted Roberto Valera and Charles Koppelman's “Cubanacan: A Revolution of Forms,” the first new Cuban opera in 50 years. During the event, Pittsburgh Festival Opera artists Christopher Scott, Robert Frankenberry, and Stephanie Ramos performed excerpts from the show.

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