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'World Tour' raises $240K for National Aviary

| Tuesday, July 11, 2017, 12:30 a.m.
John Altdorfer
DJ and Laura Miller, Night in the Tropics, National Aviary, Northside. July 8, 2017.
John Altdorfer
ulie Badamo and Michael Gouch photograph Franklin, a spectacled owl during Night in the Tropics, National Aviary, Northside. July 8, 2017.
John Altdorfer
Errika and Mark Jones, Night in the Tropics, National Aviary, Northside. July 8, 2017.
John Altdorfer
Artist Maria DiSimone, Night in the Tropics, Prascak, National Aviary, Northside. July 8, 2017.
John Altdorfer
Lee Davis, Night in the Tropics, National Aviary, Northside. July 8, 2017.
John Altdorfer
Ginny Merchant, Night in the Tropics, National Aviary, Northside. July 8, 2017.
John Altdorfer
John Altdorfer
Camara Drum entertained arriving guests during Night in the Tropics, National Aviary, Northside. July 8, 2017.
John Altdorfer
Johno Prascak, Night in the Tropics, National Aviary, Northside. July 8, 2017.
John Altdorfer
Aviary executive director Cheryl Tracy with event chair Jane Dixon, Night in the Tropics, National Aviary, Northside. July 8, 2017.
John Altdorfer
Trainer Mike Faix holds Dillion, a martial eagle from sub-Saharian Africa during Night in the Tropics, National Aviary, Northside. July 8, 2017.
John Altdorfer
WDVE's Val Porter with Tim Mackin, Night in the Tropics, National Aviary, Northside. July 8, 2017.
John Altdorfer
Cindy Faumuina, Night in the Tropics, National Aviary, Northside. July 8, 2017.

The National Aviary threw the doors open for A Night in the Tropics on July 8, running with a “World Tour” theme that appeared to have drawn most of the social world with it.

“We actually released more tickets last week because we were about to sell out,” said chair Jane Dixon with her husband, Michael.

Which is exactly what happened a day prior to the event when they tapped out at 1,300 for a record-breaking crowd.

VIPs arrived about an hour early to enjoy some pre-game before the gates officially opened at 7 p.m. Tiki torches lit, the masses fully embraced the tropical dress code.

“I got a new Tommy Bahama shirt just for the occasion,” said Colby Armstrong with his wife, Melissa. “It's usually an old man shirt, but not today.”

Elsewhere, Matt Mazefsky was turning heads with a powder blue suit that he just so happened to have hanging in his closet.

“I got it for an 80's party,” he said. “But it came in handy again.”

Lee Davis managed to up the ante with a sports coat involving birds, hibiscus flowers, and a hefty dose of foresight.

“I didn't buy it for tonight but when I did see it, I thought, ‘You never know when you might need it,'” he said.

With the Brighton Boys, Stevee Wellons and DJ Rambo ensuring that every square inch of the facility was enjoying its own soundtrack and food and drink vendors as far as the eye could see, it was anyone's guess as to how easy it would be to get people out of the party mood when things officially shut down at 11 p.m.

“It's probably going to be hard to move them out,” said Robin Weber, senior director of marketing and community relations.

On the list: Executive director Cheryl Tracy and her husband, Rick, Maris Bondi, Annette Calgaro, Jill Hosko, Kenya Boswell, Matt and Becky Spaeth, Patti Dodge, Sally Wiggin, Shaun and Erin Suisham, Erin O'Donnell, Judi and Joseph Nocito, Cynthia and Arthur Baldwin, John and Suzanne Graf, Mike and Lisa Hart, Jim and Cathy Lehman, Susan and Michael Farrell, Johno and Maria Prascak, Tom and Chris Kobus, Tom and Barbara Wiley.

The evening raised $240,000.

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