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Storm doesn't deter Bid for Hope attendees

| Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012, 8:52 p.m.
Tribune-Review
Katie and Heath Miller at the Bid for Hope XI at Jergels in Warrendale on Monday, October 29, 2012. The event supports premenopausal breast cancer research in Pittsburgh. Stephanie Strasburg | Tribune-Review
Tribune-Review
Sarah Keisel, left, and Diana Napper at the Bid for Hope XI at Jergels in Warrendale on Monday, October 29, 2012. The event supports premenopausal breast cancer research in Pittsburgh. Stephanie Strasburg | Tribune-Review
Tribune-Review
Erin and Bill Mansfield travelled all the way from Michigan to attend Bid for Hope XI at Jergels in Warrendale and get autographs from members of the Steelers on Monday, October 29, 2012. The event supports premenopausal breast cancer research in Pittsburgh. Stephanie Strasburg | Tribune-Review
Tribune-Review
Angela Criscella, 29, of North Hills, laughs with a friend at the bar during the Bid for Hope XI at Jergels in Warrendale on Monday, October 29, 2012. The event supports premenopausal breast cancer research in Pittsburgh. Stephanie Strasburg | Tribune-Review

Lest anyone need reminded just how far the long arm of Steelers Nation can stretch, Monday proved that neither an impending hurricane nor a couple of hundred miles could keep diehards from scoring a little one-on-one time with their favorites.

“We came from Michigan … we braved Frankenstorm!” confessed Bill Mansfield with his wife, Erin, as they found themselves at the end of a long autograph line that snaked its way around Jergel's Rhythm Grille.

“It's definitely worth it ... but I wish I had gotten in line sooner!” Erin added.

That sentiment was shared among a sold-out crowd that came with footballs in hand for the likes of Brett Keisel, Troy Polamalu, Chris Rainey, Charlie Batch and Leonard Pope to make their mark on. Now in its 11th year, Bid for Hope drew the likes of Walter Scheide, Tom Crowley, Chad Dewey, Jill andWalt Cavalier,Michael Cavalier, Ken Richards and his son, Austin — many of whom were repeat attendees.

“It's so important that we set the protocol for this,” shared founder Diana Napper as she spoke about the battle that women younger than 40 face with their insurance companies when it comes to early detection of breast cancer. “Come hell or high water, we're gonna change that.”

Hosted by the Steelers' Heath Miller and his wife, Katie, the event benefited A Glimmer of Hope Foundation, which focuses on breast cancer awareness. To date, Glimmer has raised more than $1.8 million to further fund the largest premenopausal breast cancer study in the nation.

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