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Troupe's theatrics are highlight of Child Health Association of Sewickley's annual ball

| Sunday, Nov. 18, 2012, 8:50 p.m.
Doug Donaldson, Linda Pell, Debbie Coonelly, and Elisa DiTommaso during The High Seas Ball â?? Child Health Association of Sewickley at the Edgeworth Club X on Saturday, November 17, 2012. Mike Mancini | For the Tribune Review
The Child Health Association Players Mike Mancini | For the Tribune Review
Courtney Jones during The High Seas Ball â?? Child Health Association of Sewickley at the Edgeworth Club X on Saturday, November 17, 2012. Mike Mancini | For the Tribune Review
Adrienne Donaldson during The High Seas Ball â?? Child Health Association of Sewickley at the Edgeworth Club X on Saturday, November 17, 2012. Mike Mancini | For the Tribune Review
Marguerite Park during The High Seas Ball â?? Child Health Association of Sewickley at the Edgeworth Club X on Saturday, November 17, 2012. Mike Mancini | For the Tribune Review
Ben and Tracey Moravitz during The High Seas Ball â?? Child Health Association of Sewickley at the Edgeworth Club X on Saturday, November 17, 2012. Mike Mancini | For the Tribune Review
Jason and Jane Bablak during The High Seas Ball â?? Child Health Association of Sewickley at the Edgeworth Club X on Saturday, November 17, 2012. Mike Mancini | For the Tribune Review
Matt Bass and Michele Cox during The High Seas Ball â?? Child Health Association of Sewickley at the Edgeworth Club X on Saturday, November 17, 2012. Mike Mancini | For the Tribune Review

The suburban sect of the glitterati made their presence known on Saturday during the Child Health Association of Sewickley's annual ball, as a parade of sequined gowns in shimmery golds, silvers, and inky blacks found their way into the Edgeworth Club.

Trending fashions aside, the evening got under way with cocktails for 300-plus, a number that instantaneously resulted in the cozy confines of the club morphing to claustrophobic proportions. Anticipation was high, though, for the curtain to rise on writer-director Marguerite Park's “A Pirate's Life for Me!,” which once again proved that these suburbanites never leave home without a self-deprecating sense of humor and an innate knowledge of how to immediately endear themselves to their audience.

Backstage, the air pulsated with an electricity consisting of half nerves, half excitement as the Child Health Association Players took a quick breather before show time. “I'm nervous as hell, are you kidding me?” joked Michele Cox. “I'd be lying if I said I wasn't nervous. But tonight gets rowdy, and they really give us some energy. If we screw up, no one notices,” she laughed.

Any screw-ups did, indeed, go unnoticed as the Players proved wildly entertaining, although the song-and-dance routines of The Way Tavern Girls (CHAOS prexy Elisa DiTommaso, Kelly Pfenninger, Linda Pell, Jane Rabe, Debbie Coonelly, Susan Grieger and Cox) and their fantastically flirty costumes were show stealers — responsible for a chorus of appreciative catcalls and a thunderous applause.

A quick change-around of the room allowed for the remainder of the tables and chairs to be set up, although dinner did get off to a much later start than anticipated. No one really seemed to mind, though. They were too busy having a ball.

Co-chaired by Tracey Moravitz (with Ben), Adrienne Donaldson, and Debbie Coonelly (with Frank), the event drew the likes of Tom andCourtney Jones, Glen andDiane Meakem, Pam andWalter Gregg, Rick andBeth Brown, Dennis and Lisa Pegden, Norm andPeggy Mitry, and Robert and Debbie Dellinger.

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