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Large crowd finds 'Purpose' for party in Lawrenceville

| Sunday, March 24, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Vanessa Veltre, Brittany Whiteside and Rachel Strittmatter (l-r) at the Pittsburgh Party for a Purpose hosted party, Grown in Lawrenceville Party to benefit the nonprofit Lawrenceville Farmers Market at Remedy on Butler Street, Friday. Photo taken March 22, 2013.
Partygoers pack into the upper floors of Remedy at the Pittsburgh Party for a Purpose hosted party, Grown in Lawrenceville Party to benefit the nonprofit Lawrenceville Farmers Market at Remedy on Butler Street, Friday. Photo taken March 22, 2013.

Hipsters were burning the midnight oil in Lawrenceville on March 22, where PGH Party for a Purpose claimed dibs on the second and third floors of Remedy on Butler Street, which went from empty to packed three deep about 20 minutes past go time.

Ahead of the event, 225 tickets had been sold, although the endless stream of people coming through the door indicated more than a few late bloomers.

“I'm really glad they opened the upstairs, because it's going to get really crowded,” Nicole Muise-Kielkucki was overheard saying as the Beagle Brothers twanged a country vibe.

Formed in 2006 by students at Carnegie Mellon University, Party for a Purpose has raised more than $33,000 for 19 area nonprofits since its inception. “It's kind of competitive, which is wonderful,” said Vanessa Veltre. This time around, it was the Lawrenceville Farmers Market that would reap the rewards.

Resembling a sassy house party proving irresistible to crash, “Grown in Lawrenceville” drew the likes of Brittany Whiteside, Rachel Strittmatter, Meredith Matthews, Molly Kwiatkowski, Cory Campbell, Kerry Soso, Megan Neuf, Jeralyn Beach and Remedy owner Tony Tumolo.

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