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Forces of Nature proves that area has designers for all seasons

| Sunday, April 7, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Jason Brown, Susie Perelman and Art Brown at Forces of Nature at Bakery Square, Friday, April 5, 2013. The event brought together four of Pittsburgh’s finest designers to create displays of Earth, Ice, Fire and Water.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Aimee Diandrea and Shayne Souleret at Forces of Nature at Bakery Square, Friday, April 5, 2013. The event brought together four of Pittsburgh’s finest designers to create displays of Earth, Ice, Fire and Water.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Sydney Carver at Forces of Nature at Bakery Square, Friday, April 5, 2013. The event brought together four of Pittsburgh’s finest designers to create displays of Earth, Ice, Fire and Water.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Breanna Velazquez serves a smoky drink made with dry ice at Forces of Nature at Bakery Square, Friday, April 5, 2013. The event brought together four of Pittsburgh’s finest designers to create displays of Earth, Ice, Fire and Water.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Cedric Shaw of Creative Juice serves drinks at Forces of Nature at Bakery Square, Friday, April 5, 2013. The event brought together four of Pittsburgh’s finest designers to create displays of Earth, Ice, Fire and Water.

Blame the whiplash on some delicious eye candy being displayed during the Forces of Nature party on April 5, where little was left to the imagination and plenty was grabbing right onto the senses.

“It took us like 45 minutes to go around the corner,” said Dean Hastings with Jon Seeley.

That sentiment was shared for the majority, who were getting a crystal-clear picture of exactly what happens when four dream teams of event pros unleash their creativity on the world, which in this case, happened to be the third-floor raw space in Bakery Square.

“I would put Pittsburgh event planners up against anyone in the world,” offered Rosemary Mendel (with Joe).

Sheila Weiner (The Event Group), Tim Komen (TK Event Studio), Bob Sendall (All in Good Taste Productions), and Shelly Tolo (TOLO Events) were the brains behind their respective themes of Ice, Fire, Earth, and Water in 20-foot vignettes. An added bonus came via some hot bodies wearing lots of paint and little else.

Hosted by Event Pros Take Action and the Pittsburgh Chapter of the International Special Events Society, the event benefits victims of natural disasters like hurricanes Katrina and Sandy. The party welcomed the likes of EPTA founder Susie and Gregg Perelman, ISES Pgh prexy Kristin Nolte, Art Brown, Jason Brown, Cindy Scott,Jill Pampena, Alissa Panichella, and Cayce Pastoor.

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