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Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix's Blacktie & Tailpipes Gala

| Sunday, July 14, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
Conor Ralph | Tribune-Review
Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix Executive Director, Dan DelBianco and wife Michelle, with a Aston Martin DB9 on July 12, 2013.
Conor Ralph | Tribune-Review
Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix committee and board memeber Gigi Saladna at the annual black-tie gala on July 12, 2103.
Conor Ralph | Tribune-Review
John and Maggie Schmotzer at the Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix annual black-tie gala with a Jaguar E-Type.
Conor Ralph | Tribune-Review
President of Brooks Brothers, Diane Ellis, and husband John with the official 2013 Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix pace car, a 2014 Jaguar F-type S.

Although a sold-out crowd of 270 was contentedly milling around the South Hills Country Club during the Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix's Blacktie & Tailpipes Gala on July 12, the fashionably late arrival of at least one highly anticipated guest sent a handful clamoring back toward the entrance.

“It's a 2014 Jaguar F-Type,” explained PVGP executive director Dan DelBianco (with Michelle). “Sticker of about $80,000. I can't wait to drive that home.”

Perks aside and subsequent loaner-car envy notwithstanding, an engine purr teased a tear out of swooning admirers, while co-chairs John and Maggie Schmotzer, Jake andToni Zoller, Diane and John Ellis, Dan Torisky an d Dr. Donna Durno, Rich Haeflein andDina Marrero, and Gigi Saladna were staking claim to their favorite vintage beauties.

“It's just a classic, ... look at those lines,” said Rusty Marmion of a gleaming, black Packard 12 from the 1930s.

The gala, pregame for the PVGP car show and races that will take over Schenley Park on July 20 and 21, benefitted the Autism Society of Pittsburgh and Allegheny Valley School.

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