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Carabella fashion show benefits Alzheimer Association

| Sunday, Aug. 25, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
Judy and Abby Spreng during the 2013 Fall Fashion Show to benefit Alzheimerâ??s Association at Carabella in Oakmont, on Friday, August 23, 2013. Mike Mancini | for the Tribune-Review
Carol Kinkela, Marijo Crowe, Jim and Judy Schwartz and Angela Grimm during the 2013 Fall Fashion Show to benefit Alzheimerâ??s Association at Carabella in Oakmont, on Friday, August 23, 2013. Mike Mancini | for the Tribune-Review

Street style

The streets of Oakmont were buzzing on Aug. 23 as 350 guests were experiencing some serious closet envy during the Carabella Fall Fashion Show to benefit the Alzheimer Association's Greater Pennsylvania Chapter.

“It's a great way to kick off for the fall 2013 season,” said Carabella owner Carol Kinkela.

Traffic had to yield to the bold and the beautiful on this summer evening as cocktails were being sipped under the tents at this wildly enjoyable block party. Once fashionistas secured a prime spot alongside the catwalk, it was show time.

From there, DJ Nugget spun the sound track, 14 models showed off 50 must-haves, and the highly anticipated “Shopping Spree” raffle ticket was drawn with much ado.

“We take the winner into the store for five minutes. Whatever she gets on her body, she keeps,” Kinkela explained.

Now in its eighth year, the event carried significant meaning for Kinkela, who has a personal connection to the association. “Little did I know that my mom would be affected by Alzheimer's. ... She died a month before we had our first event,” she said.

The evening was anticipated to raise $100K.

— Kate Benz

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