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'Defying Multiple Sclerosis' author speaks at Women on the Move Luncheon

| Sunday, Sept. 29, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
James Knox | Pittsburgh Tribune-Review
From left Anne Mageras, Roseanne Wholey, Sandra Bettor and Ronda Giangreco Wednesday, September 25, 2013 at the MS Women on the Move Luncheon at LeMont on Mount Washington.

“Mine is a story of not just coping, but thriving in the face of this disease ... with a whole lot of spaghetti,” shared keynote Ronda Giangreco during the Women on the Move Luncheon.

The foodie and author of “The Gathering Table: Defying Multiple Sclerosis With a Year of Pasta, Wine & Friends” joined event chairwoman Joan Campasano Hoover, co-chairwomen Sandy Bettor and Nancy Weiland, and Western PA MS Society chapter prexy Anne Mageras at LeMont on Sept. 25 for the 11th annual event.

“Every single dinner that I put on, every single week was a victory. During that year, we were having a blast and we forgot to be afraid,” Giangreco said.

Arlene Sokolow, Roseanne Wholey, Beth Kuhn, Nadine Bognar and emcee Ken Rice were among the attendees supporting the goal of creating a world free of MS.

“Find the blessing embedded within that curse,” Giangreco advised. “If there's one thing I learned is this: The path to that dream is rarely wide and easily traversed and we each have a choice — either let those bumps stop us in our path or move beyond them.”

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