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Pittsburgh's fashionistas gather at Warhol museum for 'Style Social'

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop
| Sunday, Aug. 3, 2014, 9:00 p.m.
Tori Mistick and Tara Rieland, event organizers at the Style Social for the Andy Warhol Museum, Wednesday, July 30, 2014.
Andrew Russell | TRIB TOTAL MEDIA
Tori Mistick and Tara Rieland, event organizers at the Style Social for the Andy Warhol Museum, Wednesday, July 30, 2014.
Erica Layne at the Style Social for the Andy Warhol Museum, Wednesday, July 30, 2014.
Andrew Russell | TRIB TOTAL MEDIA
Erica Layne at the Style Social for the Andy Warhol Museum, Wednesday, July 30, 2014.
Bridgette Luttner, Erin Szymanski and Nicole Jarock (l-r) at the Style Social for the Andy Warhol Museum, Wednesday, July 30, 2014.
Andrew Russell | TRIB TOTAL MEDIA
Bridgette Luttner, Erin Szymanski and Nicole Jarock (l-r) at the Style Social for the Andy Warhol Museum, Wednesday, July 30, 2014.

The guests viewing the Halston fashion exhibit on July 30 were as stylish as the amazing outfits being showcased on the mannequins.

It was a posh evening called “Style Social” where 60 of Pittsburgh's fashionistas gathered to discuss the latest trends and their appreciation while viewing the iconic designer's collection in “Halston and Warhol: Silver and Suede,” an exhibit at the Andy Warhol Museum, North Side, through Aug. 24.

“Eat, drink and be social,” says Tori Mistick, who, with Tara Rieland, were the event's organizers and both impeccably attired.

Attendees enjoyed fresh fruit, melt-in-your-mouth mini cupcakes and other tasty hors d'oeuvres as well as a few cocktails before browsing the exhibit of 45 garments and Warhol's personal collection of Halston shoes, cosmetics and fragrances.

The exhibit examines the interconnected lives and creative practices of Warhol and Halston — American icons who had a profound impact on the development of 20th-century art and fashion. It was organized by the Warhol and Halston's niece, Lesley Frowick. Not only did Halston collect Warhol's artwork, but Halston was portrayed in several of Warhol's works.

The crowd was invited to create fashion collages and strike a few poses in the photo booth — which was free on this night.

Among the soiree's best dressed — stylish for any runway — were Bridgette Luttner, Erin Szymanski, Nicole Jarock, Erica Layne, John Gurman, Anne Stone, Aire Plichta, Wadria Taylor, Lana and Fred Neumeyer, and Robert Rich, vice president of public relations for Marc Jacobs, who just happened to be visiting our Steel City.

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at jharrop@tribweb.com or 412-320-7889.

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