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Time for a Cure at LeMont

| Sunday, July 5, 2015, 2:47 p.m.
John Altdorfer | For Trib Total Media
Carol Massaro (center) joined her children David, Steve, Linda and Joe during Time for a Cure: Joseph A. Massaro, Jr. Alzheimer’s Research Fund at LeMont on Mt. Washington. June 28, 2015.
John Altdorfer | For Trib Total Media
Robert Glimcher tickled the ivories during Time for a Cure: Joseph A. Massaro, Jr. Alzheimer’s Research Fund at LeMont on Mt. Washington. June 28, 2015.
John Altdorfer | For Trib Total Media
Laura Knonk and Helene Finegold looked grand during Time for a Cure: Joseph A. Massaro, Jr. Alzheimer’s Research Fund at LeMont on Mt. Washington. June 28, 2015.
John Altdorfer | For Trib Total Media
Luci Massaro was among the guests attending Time for a Cure: Joseph A. Massaro, Jr. Alzheimer’s Research Fund at LeMont on Mt. Washington. June 28, 2015.
John Altdorfer | For Trib Total Media
Mike Barbarita has plenty of reasons to smile as he joins his wife Debbie during Time for a Cure: Joseph A. Massaro, Jr. Alzheimer’s Research Fund at LeMont on Mt. Washington. June 28, 2015.
John Altdorfer | For Trib Total Media
Natalie Saxon and Jason Richards were among the guests attending Time for a Cure: Joseph A. Massaro, Jr. Alzheimer’s Research Fund at LeMont on Mt. Washington. June 28, 2015.
John Altdorfer | For Trib Total Media
LeMont owner Ed Dunlap joined his wife, Anna, during Time for a Cure: Joseph A. Massaro, Jr. Alzheimer’s Research Fund at LeMont on Mt. Washington. June 28, 2015.
John Altdorfer | For Trib Total Media
Orchids decorated the tables with Downtown Pittsburgh in the background during Time for a Cure: Joseph A. Massaro, Jr. Alzheimer’s Research Fund at LeMont on Mt. Washington. June 28, 2015.

Bright, solid, caring, friendly, giving, extraordinary …

These were the words being used to describe a man whose legacy in Pittsburgh has transcended the disease that affects not only him, but 5.2 million adults nationwide.

“This is a celebration. Joe Massaro is bigger than Alzheimer's,” said Jackie Ferrara with her husband, Charlie.

Spearheaded by his wife, Carol, the Joseph A. Massaro Jr. Alzheimer's Research Fund hosted the Time for a Cure fundraiser at LeMont on June 28 with the singular goal of seeing the debilitating illness come to an end.

“I really give her credit,” said longtime friend Sandy Bettor. “She's a real lady and stands by her man, as it were.”

And standing by the Massaro family — which included David andLuci Massaro, Joe Massaro III and his wife, Alina, Steven and Stephanie Massaro, and Linda Massaro and her fiancee, Albert Girgenti — were nearly 200 guests who wanted nothing less than to support the patriarch and founder of the Massaro Corporation.

“I was fam ily from the moment I met him,” said Dr. Helene Finegold. “I feel privileged to know them. It's a family you want to be a part of.”

Following dinner, guests were treated to a performance by internationally acclaimed mezzo soprano Marianne Cornetti and accompanist Joan Krueger.

Experiencing such a supportive response was overwhelming, Carol Massaro said. “And it's not just Joe. A lot of lives have been touched by Alzheimer's.”

Spied were LeMont owners Ed and Anna Dunlap, Hoddy Hanna, Hon. Robert Gallo and Donna Murtha, Nancy andJohn Traina, Sam andJoanie Kamin, Sam Badger, Debbie andMike Barbarita, Jim andElectra Agras, Paul Gitnik and Gene Svrcek, Mark Phillis andMark Power, Robert Glimcher, Jude Giovengo, Dani and Al Grego,Laura Penrod Kronk.

The evening raised $100K, all of which benefitted the fund.

Kate Benz is the society columnist for Trib Total Media and can be reached at kbenz@tribweb.com, 412-380-8515 or via Twitter @KateBenzTRIB.

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