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FASHION FYI: Glitter and Grit hosting Lein trunk show

| Friday, Aug. 25, 2017, 8:57 p.m.
Glitter and Grit, a bridal shop at 5300 Butler St., Lawrenceville, is having a Lein trunk show by appointment though Sept. 2.
PHOTO COURTESY OF LEIN
Glitter and Grit, a bridal shop at 5300 Butler St., Lawrenceville, is having a Lein trunk show by appointment though Sept. 2.

Glitter and Grit, a bridal shop at 5300 Butler St., Lawrenceville, is having a Lein trunk show by appointment though Sept. 2. Created by Pittsburgh native Meredith Stoecklein, this line is known for making the dress customizable – one that is reflective of the bride's personal style.

Details: 412-781-2375 or glitterandgritpgh.com

It's live

The Lex & Lynne Bridal website is live. Visit it to book your appointment. The line is a carefully curated collection of romantic and whimsical wedding gowns, bridal accessories, resort and special occasion women's wear. It a private, by appointment only store located on the second floor of the Lex 7 Lynne clothing and accessories boutique, 514 Beaver St. in Sewickley.

Details: 412-259-8955 or lexandlynnebridal.com

Go to market

The Squirrel Hill Night Market is from 6 to 10 p.m. Aug. 26 along Murray Ave. This outdoor festival will feature more than 100 I Made It! Market vendors and Squirrel Hill merchants selling everything from clothing to accessories.

Details: 412-339-0523 or uncoversquirrelhill.com

Grand opening

Enhanced Creativity Event Planning will celebrate the grand opening of a new floral and linen rental shop in Sheraden from 3 to 5 p.m. Aug. 27. Owner Rae Coleman specializes in cultural weddings. Her store is located at 630 Hillsboro St.

Details: 724-831-7321

Benefit event

Highland's Health Johnstown Free Medical Clinic's annual benefit will include fashion, dance and music. Ty Hunter, Beyonce's stylist will host the event along with Derae Mora, a New York supermodel with local ties. The event will open with a fashion show featuring clothing from New York designers at 6 p.m. Aug. 26 at the Polacek Pavilion at PNG Park. Tickets at $25, $20 in advance.

Details: johnstownfreemedicalclinic.com

Shoe tips

Four shoes to toss by age 25 according associate editor Lauren Eggertsen at whowhatwear.com

Toss: Worn athletic shoes

Keep: Supportive sneakers

We have all accumulated a few pairs of running or athletic shoes over the years. Heck, some may even be from the beginning of college. While that might not seem like that long ago, that means those shoes are almost seven years old (gasp). Athletic sneakers are not something you want to keep around for too long. The wear and tear on your sneakers is an echo of how the sneakers will treat your body. When it comes to athletic shoes, you need a pair that will support you in every sport you participate in. A pair that is stylish and forward? Now that's even better.

Toss: Sky-high stilettos

Keep: Versatile heels

Sky-high stilettos were an ambitious choice you made all throughout your early 20s. Now that you're more established in your career, though, you're probably taking on a lot more than you anticipated and have a schedule that requires you to be at five different places at once, so you always want to be prepared. Toss the shoes that make your spine shiver and swap them for versatile heels that will take you from work to a cocktail party with ease. We recommend low or block heels, anything that can be dressed up or down, and of course, shoes you feel the most confident walking in.

Toss: Rubber flip-flop

Keep: Sleek slides

Why keep wearing those flimsy rubber flip-flops you hardly like when you could wear any of the gorgeous and interesting slides ahead? Seriously, rubber flip-flops might be convenient, but that's exactly what they scream—convenience. You're officially at the age where dressing like an adult is not longer dressing like an adult because you kind of are one (whatever that means). Whether you're running errands, heading to the beach or looking for the easiest shoe on the planet, let sleek slides trump rubber flip-flops every time.

Toss: Round-toe flats

Keep: Pointed-toe loafers

I know, round-toe flats are oddly specific, but the shape is one that never looks as polished as it could, especially in comparison to a pointed-toe flat. My preference for 25-year-olds? A pointed-toe slide loafer. The shape of that flat elongates your legs and creates an interesting focal point to any outfit whether it be distressed jeans and a tee or a more work-appropriate look.

Staff and wire reports

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