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Fashion FYI: Contemporary Craft exhibit follows jewelry from concept to creation

| Sunday, Sept. 10, 2017, 9:00 p.m.
Shuoyuan Bai. Circle Brooch, 2016. Olive quartz, acrylic, reticulation silver, sterling silver, stainless steel. 3 x 3 x 1⁄2”. It will be at Contemporary Craft, 2100 Smallman St., Strip District, as part of Exhibition in Print: Repair and Renewal in partnership with the Society of North American Goldsmiths (SNAG) to reveal innovative approaches on how contemporary jewelry and metal objects are conceived, made and displayed. This exhibit runs through Nov. 25.
Shuoyuan Bai
Shuoyuan Bai. Circle Brooch, 2016. Olive quartz, acrylic, reticulation silver, sterling silver, stainless steel. 3 x 3 x 1⁄2”. It will be at Contemporary Craft, 2100 Smallman St., Strip District, as part of Exhibition in Print: Repair and Renewal in partnership with the Society of North American Goldsmiths (SNAG) to reveal innovative approaches on how contemporary jewelry and metal objects are conceived, made and displayed. This exhibit runs through Nov. 25.
Annette Dam. Life Unexpected (necklace), 2015. Silver, freshwater pearls, resin, elastic band. 35 x 18 x 4 cm.  It will be at Contemporary Craft, 2100 Smallman St., Strip District, as part of Exhibition in Print: Repair and Renewal in partnership with the Society of North American Goldsmiths (SNAG) to reveal innovative approaches on how contemporary jewelry and metal objects are conceived, made and displayed. This exhibit runs through Nov. 25.
Dorte Krogh
Annette Dam. Life Unexpected (necklace), 2015. Silver, freshwater pearls, resin, elastic band. 35 x 18 x 4 cm. It will be at Contemporary Craft, 2100 Smallman St., Strip District, as part of Exhibition in Print: Repair and Renewal in partnership with the Society of North American Goldsmiths (SNAG) to reveal innovative approaches on how contemporary jewelry and metal objects are conceived, made and displayed. This exhibit runs through Nov. 25.
Chad Bridgewater. DP-220 (CNC Carver), 2015. Salvaged 1941 Delta 14” drill press, salvaged electric motor, stepper motors, belts, pulleys, steel, PC, tepper motor controller, cast iron, aluminum, 3D prints, acrylic, ball bearings, steel hardware, power supply. 31 x 23 x 67”. It will be at Contemporary Craft, 2100 Smallman St., Strip District, as part of Exhibition in Print: Repair and Renewal in partnership with the Society of North American Goldsmiths (SNAG) to reveal innovative approaches on how contemporary jewelry and metal objects are conceived, made and displayed. This exhibit runs through Nov. 25.
Courtesy of Chad Bridgewater
Chad Bridgewater. DP-220 (CNC Carver), 2015. Salvaged 1941 Delta 14” drill press, salvaged electric motor, stepper motors, belts, pulleys, steel, PC, tepper motor controller, cast iron, aluminum, 3D prints, acrylic, ball bearings, steel hardware, power supply. 31 x 23 x 67”. It will be at Contemporary Craft, 2100 Smallman St., Strip District, as part of Exhibition in Print: Repair and Renewal in partnership with the Society of North American Goldsmiths (SNAG) to reveal innovative approaches on how contemporary jewelry and metal objects are conceived, made and displayed. This exhibit runs through Nov. 25.

Contemporary Craft, 2100 Smallman St., Strip District, is presenting Exhibition in Print: Repair and Renewal in partnership with the Society of North American Goldsmiths (SNAG) to reveal innovative approaches on how contemporary jewelry and metal objects are conceived, made and displayed. This exhibit, which runs through Nov. 25, showcases outstanding metal artworks by over 20 artists and members of SNAG.

Details: 412-261-7003 or contemporarycraft.org

Bag it

The $1-A-Bag Sale at Open Hands Boutique, located in the Cook Township Community Building, Rt. 711 Stahlstown is Sept. 11-14. Gently used clothing for all members of the family is available. Proceeds are used to provide layettes – a collection of clothing and accessories for newborns – for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) eligible families.

Details: 724-593-1698

Trunk shows

Crossroads Boutique & Cattiva, 24 W. 2nd., St., Greensburg, is having a Carlisle Collection trunk show from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sept. 11. Browse the fall line for this brand known for using truly luxurious fabrics.

Details: 724-832-8900

One Brilliant, 12 Brilliant Ave., Aspinwall, is having a Joseph Ribkoff trunk show from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sept. 14. View the line's fall and holiday collections.

Details: 412-781-3443 or onebrilliant.com

Larrimor's, a men's and women's clothing and accessories boutique, 249 Fifth Ave., Pittsburgh, is having Canali and Magnanni trunk shows from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sept. 14 and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sept. 15-16. Meet representative Peter Belci of menswear Canali and Colin Combes from men's shoes designer Magnanni.

Details: 412-471-5727 or larrimors.com

MB Bride, 123 S. Urania Ave., Greensburg, is having Casablanca and Vienna Homecoming and Prom dress trunk shows by appointment Sept. 15-17. Receive a 10 percent discount during show days. Vienna designer Jimmy Huang will be in store late on Sept. 15, all day Sept. 16 and most of the day Sept. 17.

Details: 724-836-6626 or mbbride.com

Pop-Up Shoppe

Mustard Seed Productions presents a Vintage Clothes N'at Pop-Up Shoppe workshop and pre-sale from 8 to 10 p.m. Sept. 15 at 1427 Davis Ave., Pittsburgh's North Side. At the workshop from 8 to 9 p.m. where designer Lisa Marie Bruno will teach attendees how to tell vintage authentic garments from reproductions, clean hats without washing, taking correct measurements, and about hemming and sewing garments. Tickets are $20. There will be also be a sale from noon to 8 p.m. on Sept. 16.

Details: http://wwwlisamariebrunowebstartscom.webstarts.com/

Need a haircut?

Stylists at Studio Booth, 6343 Penn Ave., in Pittsburgh's East End, are partaking in the Wella Craft Class to advance their cutting skills. The salon is looking for individuals who need a haircut free of charge. The event begins at 9:30 a.m. Sept. 11.

Details: 412-362-6684 or studio-booth.com

Back-to-school style

It's time to head back-to-school. So whether you are hitting the classroom, starting a new internship or looking for a little fall wardrobe inspiration, InStyle.com pulled a few simple tips from none other than the queens of Upper East Side style -- Gossip Girl's Serena van der Woodsen and Blair Waldorf, of course!

Swap out your backpack for a chic tote: Blair and Serena always had the best handbag game, even for school. So why not choose a tote bag that is both fashionable and functional in lieu of a backpack this season? Look for an iconic style with removable cross-body straps to take you past the classroom for years to come.

Try a classic camel coat: Serena knew you could never go wrong with a timeless camel colored coat that would literally work with everything in your wardrobe, from uniform to weekend. Try an updated shape with details, such as a faux fur collar, brass buttons, or an elongated hemline for a new twist on the classic.

Mix menswear motifs: Take a cue from Blair, who always aced her texture and print mixing, and try out this season's hottest trend – menswear motifs. A printed blazer works well under an oversized checked coat for a refreshingly new spin on the look. Remember to keep things in a similar color palette to not look over-the-top!

Comfort is key when it comes to shoes: It's not secret why Serena was constantly pairing boots with her school uniforms. A perfect leather riding boot with a flat sole is the comfortable choice for running around campus from class to class.

Don't be afraid of color: Matching your coat to your accessories is a definite do, especially in this season's hottest shade of cherry red. Look for classic silhouettes and shapes that will never go out of style a la Blair.

Fall for it

Cosmpolitan.com says these must-have trends are blowing up for fall.

Fringe: Shake, shake, shake.

Fun fur: Fun for you. Because of the fun colors and patterns. Not so fun for animals. Faux, though. Faux is for everyone.

Bedtime stories: Robes and PJs and slips and quilts worn as ponchos—it's the next best thing to actually just staying home and laying in bed all day.

Florals: But, like, dark, romantic florals.

Glitter bomb: Be more like a disco ball.

Cloth of gold: Velvet is always big for fall, but this time around, the color of the moment is gold –richness on top of richness.

Hot mess: Undone, deconstructed, or, in some cases, just plain falling apart, piled on layer after odd, mismatched layer.

Leather pants: Looser than leather leggings and more edgy thanks to all the fun details.

Supersized shearling: It's just cozy!

One-shoulder: Sexy and oh-so slinky.

Patchwork: The easy way to mix prints.

Neutral plaids: They are so retro!

Political slogans: The fashion community – both in America and abroad – has a lot to say about the state of the union.

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