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Manstyle event helps guys not to fear fashion

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop
| Tuesday, Sept. 25, 2012, 1:10 a.m.
Bentley Hicks (right) helps Vince Sims try on a suit at Larrimor's, Downtown on Thursday evening, in preparation for Pittsburgh Fashion Week's menswear fashion show.
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Bentley Hicks (right) helps Vince Sims try on a suit at Larrimor's, Downtown on Thursday evening, in preparation for Pittsburgh Fashion Week's menswear fashion show. Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Bentley Hicks helps Vince Sims try on a suit at Larrimor's, Downtown on Thursday evening, in preparation for Pittsburgh Fashion Week's menswear fashion show.
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Bentley Hicks helps Vince Sims try on a suit at Larrimor's, Downtown on Thursday evening, in preparation for Pittsburgh Fashion Week's menswear fashion show. Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Bentley Hicks picks out a tie at Larrimor's, Downtown on Thursday evening, in preparation for Pittsburgh Fashion Week's menswear fashion show.
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Bentley Hicks picks out a tie at Larrimor's, Downtown on Thursday evening, in preparation for Pittsburgh Fashion Week's menswear fashion show. Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
A suit, tie, and shirt at Larrimor's, Downtown on Thursday evening, in preparation for Pittsburgh Fashion Week's menswear fashion show.
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
A suit, tie, and shirt at Larrimor's, Downtown on Thursday evening, in preparation for Pittsburgh Fashion Week's menswear fashion show. Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review

Television personalities Vince Sims of WPXI , Andrew Stockey of WTAE and Rick Dayton of KDKA will be making news, rather than covering it this week.

The trio will strut their stuff as featured models for the second ManStyle fashion show at the third-annual Pittsburgh Fashion Week. The show begins at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Senator John Heinz History Center.

“For the fashion show, I can go a little wilder,” says Sims, at a fitting at Larrimor's, Downtown. “I want flashy. I really enjoy doing events like this, because it's cool. And I want something I wouldn't wear on air, because on air I have to be more conservative.”

Sims was sharply dressed in a gray suit, blue shirt and red tie in front of a mirror as Larrimor's sales associate Bentley Hicks looked on.

This men-focused clothing show is an important part of fashion week. It helps create awareness that men's fashions do exist, says Miyoshi Anderson, executive director of the week-long event.

“I know men don't always think of themselves as fashionable, but they are, and we women love to see men dressed well,” Anderson says. “Men may not always want to shop for themselves but women love to shop for men. I would hope this show would help inform about men's fashions and help the guys know that men's fashions do matter.”

When Anderson approached Larrimor's about dressing the television celebrities, the answer was yes right away.

“I was more than happy to do it,” said Tom Michael, co-owner of Larrimor's with Lisa Slesinger. “It's about supporting the local community. This is a way for us to give back to the city of Pittsburgh that has always supported us. The show should be a good one, and we are excited about being a part of it.”

So is Stockey, who participated in last year's show. He says men sometimes are satisfied with wearing what he calls “a uniform,” or a basic outfit. But Pittsburgh Fashion Week will give guys additional ideas about style, he says.

“Men can take that basic suit and make it their own by adding a fun pair of cuff links or a bright tie, which I like to do,” said Stockey, who will be donning a tuxedo, which he says “fits like a glove.”

“Miyoshi is doing a great thing for this city,” he says. “She is showing that this blue collar town has a style all its own.”

Helping to customize that style is Carly Brown, co- owner of C. Brown Custom Clothiers with cousin Corey Brown, who will be participating in fashion week for the first time. Other apparel companies participating are Verdette Clothing and Suited 4 Work.

Carly and Corey Brown recently started their business — for both men and women — and will be part of Saturday's full-day schedule of back-to-back runway shows.

Styles will encompass everything from black-tie to casual wear, Carly Brown says. They will showcase 11 models — of various shapes and sizes -— showing many combinations of custom-designed apparel.

“Fashion is a fun business, and this show should be really fun,” Carly Brown says. “We love working with our clients. We make it convenient for them because we go to where they are, their home or their office. We try to make the custom-shopping experience as easy as possible. We have found some clients know exactly what they want, while others aren't so sure. It's our job to help them out. And Pittsburgh Fashion Week will be a way to get the word out about what we do.”

It will also be an opportunity to continue to let Pittsburghers know more about Steel City style through the runway walks of chic men who dress well, including local television celebrities.

“I am glad Pittsburgh has its own fashion week, and I think it needs a fashion week,” Sims says. “It's just another step up for this happening city.”

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at jharrop@tribweb.com or 412-320-7889.

What's new in men's fall fashions

Three's company: Every man should own a three-piece suit.

Checks and balances: There is an enormous explosion of pattern on suits and sport coats. Windowpane and checked plaid have come roaring back.

Buckle up: The double monkstrap has moved into the realm of everyman attainable, coming in at all price points in modified styles from wingtip to cap toe.

The indigo dress shirt: Denim and chambray shirts have received their fair share of love, but what makes these indigo options new is that they're appropriate to wear in front of the big boss.

Double up: The season of the topcoat was made very clear through the Milan, Paris and New York shows. The double-breasted silhouette is a versatile and essential piece.

Cable guy: The cable knit every guy needs isn't a prepped out pastel, but a chunky sweater that takes the textbook weave into more rugged territory.

Bomber squad: The true bomber jacket is an iconic piece.

Get a driver: The driving cap had a renaissance of sorts on the runways for Fall 2012, rendered in every lofty fall fabric from herringbone and Donegal tweeds to checked wool.

Pins and needles: No longer just for bankers, pinstripes are making a comeback in fashionable menswear.

Re-corded: Corduroy, the hearty winter fabric, is back and better than ever.

Dot knots: Polka dot ties are back, modernized with slimmer cuts.

Wine-O's: Maroon, burgundy, wine – the collective minds in menswear are all having a merlot moment this season.

Chelsea Swagger: The codes of Brit style are everywhere, and few things are more quintessentially British than the Chelsea boot.

Source: GQ magazine

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