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Go full-bloom fashion to spice up spring

| Thursday, March 28, 2013, 8:55 p.m.

Everything's coming up roses — and daffodils and daisies and anemones, too. Designers with a floral fixation splashed blooms on sheaths, skirts, shirts and shoes on spring runways from New York to Paris. One particularly exuberant look in Jenna Lyons' J. Crew collection painted a super-bright palette of pink, green and yellow petals for a mixed bouquet. Trying this at home has its perils unless you've got a master's in pairing patterns. Beginners, select one petal-printed piece before heading into full-fledged flower-girl territory.

• Floral-patterned jeans don't flatter every figure. Er, better make that most figures. But should you be so svelte, dig deep into your wallet for some on-trend soft pastel flower-printed denim pants from C. Wonder. Stretch skinny floral jean, $128 at C. Wonder stores and www.cwonder.com.

• The black canvas background saves multicolored rose-print Vans sneakers from being too cutesy. The contrasting white, rubber edges give them a vintage vibe. All in all, your feet will be fit to party at a casual soiree or to walk around the neighborhood. Come warmer weather, pair with white jeans or a flare skirt. $55 at www.nastygal.com.

• Neon gives a sweet, ladylike collar a touch of sass. An early-spring pick-me-up or a summer staple, the necklace has a powerful pop of pink and yellow that can dress up a basic work outfit or up the glamour quotient on, say, a strapless cocktail frock. $55 at www.topshop.com.

Janet Bennett Kelly is a writer for The Washington Post.

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